• bradley

    Way-too-early NFL Week 1 best bets: Don’t sleep on the new-look Browns or Bears vs. rivals

    https://www.cbssports.com/nfl/news/way-too-early-nfl-week-1-best-bets-dont-sleep-on-the-new-look-browns-or-bears-vs-rivals/

    Broncos (-2) vs. Seahawks

  • bradley

    Kellen Winslow Jr.’s rep: He was house shopping for mother-in-law when neighbor called police

    https://www.cbssports.com/nfl/news/kellen-winslow-jr-s-rep-he-was-house-shopping-for-mother-in-law-when-neighbor-called-police/

  • bradley

    The Biggest Standout of Every NFL Team’s Offseason so Far

    http://bleacherreport.com/articles/2779923-the-biggest-standout-of-every-nfl-teams-offseason-so-far#slide0

    Carolina Panthers: CB Lorenzo Doss

    • Jason

      I seem to recall him getting lots of praise in camp last year too. Either it doesn’t translate to pads or he was a victim of a very competitive secondary. I wish him well.

      • Carsonic

        Doss? Yeah, I remember that about his camp, too. It will be interesting to see if he can carry that success into the regular season this year.

    • Alaskan

      I know these preseason fluff pieces don’t mean anything, and it is happy-time for every fan base.
      But still, it is nice to see that Case is the guy they pick as the Broncos’ standout.

  • Drewredux

    https://youtu.be/V06fFR9sSAo

    So Freeman is arguably one of the more important youngsters…

    What I like: what-ever- I-need speed. It’s usually a good sign.

    What is worrisome: his initial burst doesn’t pop. Usually not a good sign.

    • Carsonic

      From what I’ve read, an injury caused him to be notably slower in his final year, so I really hope that he’s completely healed from that and he regains that speed you’re referring to (that is evident in ’15 and ’16 highlights).

      What I see here is lots of good blocking, which isn’t directly much credit to him, but at the same time I see really good vision and quick decision-making to follow those blocks (or not) and find the open field. I’ve complained about the Broncos’ lack of that kind of decision-making a lot, and speculated that it had something to do with Studesville. Booker was reportedly noted for his vision in college, so if we see that attribute return, and Freeman can keep his, we should be on to something. That is, of course, if we can provide similarly good blocking.

    • Jason

      For all of the general criticism about Freeman’s speed, I sure saw a lot of long runs and not many times he got caught from behind.

      • Drewredux

        I really like him at the second level and beyond. He sets guys up, then strings move together. He’ll get physical. Hard to catch. He shows good vision.

        I just worry about him having the burst to get to the second level in the NFL.

  • bradley
    • Carsonic

      I will be so ecstatic (and surprised) if he turns out to be the diamond in the rough that justified that draft position. That would mean he has the smarts to go along with the size and athleticism. Then if he develops the instincts – my goodness. Still in wait-and-see mode, though.

      • bradley

        We could get nice seasons from some of last years Rooks – the Hendersons, McKenzie, Langley and Bolles. And I’m big on this years Rooks, especially Jewell and Freeman.

        • Carsonic

          Agree on D. Henderson and Bolles, plus Butt, with fingers crossed about the others. As for rookies, I’m pretty psyched about Jewell and our WRs… and I go back and forth on Freeman, who I think has huge upside, but I just want to see him go against NFL talent before I exhale.

        • Drewredux

          Sutton has my imagination tweaking. He has special body control/ball skills. If he can refine the routes, he will be a special player.

          Great personality, too.

          I just don’t want to get ahead of myself. The inability to seperate in the MAC usually doesn’t bode well in the NFL.

        • G Mik

          You left out Butts and Walker who I think have the best shots to have great seasons out of everyone.

  • bradley
  • Nick

    So I saw that late last night one particular user was complaining about politics being discussed on a Broncos site. I looked at this user’s comment history on Disqus, and every single comment to this site has been either about politics itself, or complaining about politics on this site. Perhaps this user isn’t as averse to talking politics as is claimed.

    • Jason

      No, he’s certainly not. Some of the comments in that exchange were pretty sad.

    • bradley

      THIN AIR:

      “Providing a home for those wishing to read and write insightful commentary on the Denver Broncos and more”

      I thought about saying something like this, but really the guy has the brain wattage of a gnat so why bother?

    • Drewredux

      There are legions of BroncRobs infesting the interwebs. Yet they have the thinnest little pansy skin imaginable.

      It’s like watching a really bad SNL perpetually, but it’s real.

      • Yahmule

        Can you imagine how weak you have to be to see Donald Trump as strong?

        • Drewredux

          I honestly can’t wrap my head around the cult of Donald Trump. I just can’t.

          I have never been more vexed.

          • Nick
          • Yahmule

            At its core is an anti-intellectualism and the inherent inferiority complex that typically goes along with that mentality. I think about a conversation I had with a family member about ten years ago. She had a bone to pick with “experts.” Like, all of them. She could not understand why the opinions of people who have devoted years of schooling and outside study to a particular field should be regarded as more valid than her own. Now, we all might disagree with a particular person put forth as an expert or selected opinions of any individual, but this was more of an overarching attitude of resistance towards educated opinions. Very much a walking example of Dunning-Kruger with exactly the mentality Charles Pierce was describing in Idiot America. Would it surprise you to know she is an unswerving supporter of Donald Trump now?

            She sold real estate in Southern California for many years. After one diatribe about these know-nothing know-it-alls who she distrusts so thoroughly, I asked her if someone was trying to get the best advice on how to sell their house when she was a realtor what would have been their best recourse. Should they have listed their property with her or would they have been better off soliciting random advice from strangers? She acknowledged that her expertise would have been the better choice. And still didn’t concede anything about her overall perspective on the topic.

            Logical arguments don’t work on people who believe things for illogical reasons.

          • DCJ1

            I think part of the problem is the world has gotten so complex that for most the world’s population we’ve passed beyond Clarke’s law (Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic). They use the toys that science provides, but they don’t know enough science to understand how their toys work. People begin to feel dispossessed because the world is moving faster than they can keep up with, so they stop trying to keep up. That in turn leads to an inability to distinguish between science and psuedoscience. Add in the strong streak of anti-intellectualism prevalent in the US from day one (damn intellectuals think they’re better than us!), and you get to the point where demagogues can manipulate the population.

            In man’s evolution he has created the cities and the motor traffic rumble,
            But give me half a chance and I’d be taking off my clothes and living in the jungle
            ‘Cos the only time that I feel at ease
            Is swinging up and down in a coconut tree
            Oh what a life of luxury
            To be like an ape man
            – Ray Davies, Apeman

          • Carsonic

            Thanks, man, I haven’t thought of that excellent song in a long time.

          • T. Jensen

            part of the problem is the tech companies’ fault. Growing up I was able to take apart my electronic devices and rebuild them/add new parts. I was also able to program on them with very little work on my part (they all had built in compilers etc). In other words people were allowed to customize/create/experiment/learn.

            Now all devices have a sticker on them saying the warranty is void if opened (which is probably illegal). Programming has become easier and harder and many devices have walled garden environments. Its like they are actively encouraging users to be sheep/ignorant. They also don’t want you or anyone else to fix the devices (must be a certified repair shop). That device is theirs not yours, even though you bought it.

          • Yahmule

            Since we’re talking about books today. Carl Sagan’s Demon Haunted World speaks to this, and our current predicaments, with a clarity and poignance that seems like it was written yesterday instead of 23 years ago.

            ‘I have a foreboding of an America in my children’s or my grandchildren’s time — when the United States is a service and information economy; when nearly all the key manufacturing industries have slipped away to other countries; when awesome technological powers are in the hands of a very few, and no one representing the public interest can even grasp the issues; when the people have lost the ability to set their own agendas or knowledgeably question those in authority; when, clutching our crystals and nervously consulting our horoscopes, our critical faculties in decline, unable to distinguish between what feels good and what’s true, we slide, almost without noticing, back into superstition and darkness. The dumbing down of America is most evident in the slow decay of substantative content in the enormously influential media, the 30-second sound bites (now down to 10 seconds or less), lowest common denominator programming, credulous presentations on pseudoscience and superstition, but especially a kind of celebration of ignorance.’

          • Yahmule

            I also believe the resentment of intellectuals is ingrained in our culture and especially pernicious because it’s thoroughly reinforced at a young age. Richard Hofstadter won a Pulitzer in 1964 for Anti-Intellectualism in American Life. From the time I was a little kid, scientists were depicted as dorks in horn-rimmed glasses with pocket protectors and zero hope of ever going on a date with a woman. It wasn’t always this way. Einstein became internationally famous more than 20 years before the first television was sold to the public.

          • Drewredux

            My father in law theorized the other day that the only reason the evil democrats were sympathetic to Mexicans was that they are desperate for the votes. They are not equal too him, and the notion that ANYBODY views them as equals is truly fantastical to him.

            The notion of altruism to these alt right fucks is as foreign as empathy is to a psychopath; and that thinking is bleeding across to the otherwise decent conservative gold ol boy. This is a white, Christian nation after all.

            It’s kind of sad, really.

          • Yahmule

            I’ve always lived in a city with a large Hispanic population. I think it’s amazing when you see someone who struggles to convey an interesting thought in their native language, yet feels like they’re superior to someone smart enough to be bilingual. It’s kind of like how some white people feel like they have some greater American birthright, but if you look up the genealogy of a random black person and do the same for a random white person, the black person will usually have more generations who lived and died on American soil.

          • gnasses

            If at any point anyone’s debate logic devolves into “fuck those people” (whatever their other is) or “well that’s just too bad” they have lost any claim to morality. It might be gymnastic logic but one can advocate for a selfish position, while maintaining that they are supporting a position that is a best outcome for society in general. Or claim that others don’t understand what is best for themselves. Seems like most don’t even feel the need to try to justify it any more.

    • Andrew

      We’re just all libtards that are ungrateful with the amazing job the fuhrer is doing to MAGA.

      • G Mik

        And who doesn’t love living in M and D’s basement? Amiright?

        • VonSwenson

          I took that “mother’s basement” comment to be about his mother’s anus.

    • gnasses

      Dang, I was day drinking yesterday and sleeping early last night and I missed it….

  • bradley

    Woody Paige: Denver Broncos will ride the shotgun, ‘Pegasus’ offense, under Bill Musgrave

    http://gazette.com/article/1627454

    I asked the money question: “Are you putting Case under center or in the shotgun?”

    His response: “I don’t want Case to turn his back on the defense.”

    • Carsonic

      OK, so “Pegasus” = Bronco with wings, like for an air attack, right? Took me a while to figure that one out.

      And (a couple days late, I know) Woody just reminded me of one of my English language pet peeves: people saying/writing “viola” instead of “voila.” OMIGOD, THAT LETTER TRANSPOSITION MAKES IT INTO A COMPLETELY DIFFERENT WORD THAT IS PRONOUNCED COMPLETELY DIFFERENTLY!!… And a close second is people spelling it “wallah!” [shudder].

      • Nick

        George Carlin had a good rant in one of his books on people that use foreign words to make themselves sound more sophisticated than they really are.

    • G Mik

      So that rules out a lot of play action which is where he excelled last year. Hmmm.

  • Nick

    I decided yesterday to go to PFR to look at Broncos players sorted by AV contributed to the team, as I was curious which positions are historically stronger or weaker at the top. It’s not a perfect metric because of free agency in later years, but it was still entertaining enough.

    Anyway, QB was far and away at the top thanks to Elway. Anyone want to guess which position was at the bottom?

    • Jason

      O line?

      • Nick

        Be more specific.

        • Jason

          Right tackle?

          • Nick

            The top RT is actually second best among the Broncos’ biggest contributors on the O-line.

    • Jeremy

      I’m not sure I understand the question. You add up av for every position for the Broncos throughout time and see which is the highest/lowest?

  • Nick

    https://sports.yahoo.com/10-degrees-mensa-members-idea-can-solve-almost-baseballs-problems-070035170.html

    A Mensa member gives suggestions for improving baseball. But the one idea that intrigued me the most was #5, where the top seed gets to choose its opponent. I immediately started thinking of the times the Broncos were the #1 seed in the AFC, and who they would have to choose. Here’s the list of years and options:

    –1977: #2 BAL (10-4), #3 PIT (9-5), #4 OAK (11-3)
    –1987: #2 CLE (10-5), #3 IND (9-6), #4 HOU (9-6)
    –1989: #2 CLE (9-6-1), #3 BUF (9-7), #5 PIT (9-7)
    –1996: #2 NE (11-5), #3 PIT (10-6), #5 JAX (9-7)
    –1998: #2 NYJ (12-4), #3 JAX (11-5), #4 MIA (10-6)
    –2012: #2 NE (12-4), #3 HOU (12-4), #4 BAL (10-6)
    –2013: #2 NE (12-4), #4 IND (11-5), #6 SD (9-7)
    –2015: #2 NE (12-4), #5 KC (11-5), #6 PIT (10-6)

    • Nick

      Also, as a bonus: do the the Chiefs dare pick the Broncos in 1997, or do they just delay the inevitable? (The other options were an 11-5 NE and a 10-6 PIT.)

    • Yahmule

      This would be a great setup because of the added motivation for the lower seed.

      • Nick

        Yeah, I thought about that quickly too. “Those guys think we’re the worst team left, well we’ll see about that!”

    • Jeremy

      2012 we should have definitely picked the TJ Yates lead Texans.

  • Drewredux

    So we’ve done music a few times, how about books?

    My top 5 works of fiction.

    1). Lonesome Dove, Larry McMurtry

    2). The World According to Garp, John Irving

    3). Better Times Than These, Winston Groom

    4) The Stand, Stephen King

    5) Fool’s Crow, James Welch

    • bradley

      Plum Island, Nelson DeMille
      Shogun, James Clavell
      War and Peace, Leo Tolstoy
      Absolute Zero, Chuck Logan
      Camouflage, Joe Haldeman

    • Yahmule

      Lonesome Dove is a great choice for number one. I gave up on King many years ago, but I thought The Stand was his best work.

      • Carsonic

        I absolutely loved The Stand when I first read it, but recently I bought a Kindle version that turned out to be an “author’s edition” or something that has a bunch more of King’s rambling, tangential side stories, and I couldn’t get more than about a fourth of the way through without giving up in exhaustion.

        • Carsonic

          *…when I first read it in high school,…

          • Drewredux

            I remain a sucker for the sweeping King epic. I loved It and Under the Doom; the latter somewhat bashfully. 🤗

          • Carsonic

            I also recently re-read Firestarter and that honestly almost made it on to my Honorable Mention list. It’s really good.

          • Drewredux

            The Shining, IMO, is his best work. He writes Danny Torrance with incredible depth and nuance.

          • Carsonic

            Yes! How could I forget that one?!?

          • Yahmule

            ‘Salem’s Lot and The Dead Zone were great, too. I think you could make a strong case that King’s four best books were among his first six published.

          • Drewredux

            Most definitely. Some of his early work transcends the genre, so to speak.

            He and McMurtry both have a gift for character development.

          • Yahmule

            Dean Koontz wrote some really good stuff early. Phantoms was one of the best horror novels of all time. He’s just so formulaic, though I guess this is part of the problem of being excessively prolific, too. Pretty soon, your tendencies become as apparent as a Jon Gruden offense.

          • Drewredux

            Dark Rivers of the Heart chilled me. The psychopath in that one upped the game a little.

          • Piglet62

            Don’t sleep on Pet Sematary. Reading that as a middle aged parent and it is an entirely different book than the one I read at 20-something. It’s just brutal. I actually think King is a better short story writer than a novelist, but after the 70s and early 80s he got really hit-or-miss, and lost his fastball entirely after the car accident, IMO. Eyes of the Dragon is a great little book for the Harry Potter fans among us, too.

          • Yahmule

            I agree and would put Pet Sematary in the top five. Probably his creepiest work ever. I also agree that some of his best stuff has been novellas and short stories. Night Shift, which collected all his shorts from his starving artist days when he was mainly published in third rate skin mags, was amazing. I liked Eyes of the Dragon, too.

            I never got into the Dark Tower series. I have a first edition of the Gunslinger that holds zero sentimental value.

          • Piglet62

            That first edition may be valuable. King rewrote the Gunslinger at some point and made it much worse. I’m not sure how hard it is to find the original now.

          • Yahmule

            Good news for me. It’s in really good condition. I have a couple first editions of Cycle of the Werewolf, too, but I doubt they’ve appreciated that much. Bernie Wrightson was amazing, though.

          • Yahmule

            It had great moments, but it felt to me like King was kind of cleaning out his attic a little bit by slapping a lot of unused stuff onto the framework of the Pennywise story. I didn’t like the extraterrestrial element and the infamous sewer scene remains incomprehensible.

          • Drewredux

            The ending blew.

            I thought he neared Danny Torrance work with some of the kids. Ben, in particular, just vibrated off the pages.

            I loved and rooted for that kid like he was real.

          • Yahmule
          • gnasses

            Have to check that out, as Simmons’ Hyperion series is fantastic.

          • DCJ1

            Simmons is one of the few authors I follow faithfully. Summer of Night is the first of a cycle of four books: Children of the Night, Fires of Eden, and A Winter Haunting all feature some of the kids that survived Summer of Night.

            Simmons is also really good at writing semi-historical novels that incorporate an element of the supernatural into historical event. His novels Drood, The Abominable, and The Terror all leave you trying to reconcile actual historical events with weird supernatural events was it real or was it mass psychosis?

          • Yahmule

            Carrion Comfort was a very disturbing concept.

          • Carsonic

            Don’t say that to my oldest daughter. She’d fight ya. 🙂

          • Yahmule

            I can relate. I was also protective of King’s reputation when I was in my early teens. My attitude towards his critics was basically you’re jealous because he’s prolific and popular. I was 13 when The Shining came out and I remember it being a big deal to me that I read this adult novel before it was made into a movie. Unlike Steve, I thought the movie was a trip. I did agree with his principal criticism that Jack Nicholson Torrance was clearly a pretty severely fucked up dude before he ever set foot in the Overlook Hotel. But, if we’re going to nitpick, I totally got that book Jack was an alkie. Having it repeated on nearly every page was effective in conveying that this poor bastard was dying for another drink, but still a distraction for the reader.

        • Yahmule

          The author’s edition contains 600 pages that were unnecessary. Becoming popular enough to ignore an editor’s control is not a good thing for most writers.

          • DCJ1

            Sort of like letting Lucas revise Star Wars…

          • Yahmule

            That was so lame. I found some artwork I did when I was in my late teens recently and my eye quickly found all the flaws. The idea of sitting down and “correcting” those pictures would seem grossly disrespectful to the kid who drew them.

        • Russ

          That’s how I felt about Infinite Jest 🙄

      • Drewredux

        I was going with the spirit of how they resonated at the moment.

        I just went back and read reviews on “Better Times Than These” and it got largely panned. It probably wouldn’t resonate as much for me now, but it was great to me then.

        King has a rallied a bit of late. His middle year’s are pretty bad, but I’ve been been pleasantly surprised by some of his newer stuff.

    • Carsonic

      In no particular order:

      Far From the Madding Crowd, Thomas Hardy
      To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee
      Breakfast of Champions, Kurt Vonnegut
      Speaker for the Dead, Orson Scott Card
      The Color Purple, Alice Walker

      Hon. Mention: Aztec, Gary Jennings; The Age of Innocence, Edith Wharton; Jitterbug Perfume, Tom Robbins

      • Yahmule

        The Color Purple was a transportive experience.

        • Carsonic

          Definitely. It made my mind work and experience thoughts in a completely new way.

      • Drewredux

        I tried to name a couple daughters Scout, but cooler heads prevailed…maybe.

      • bradley

        They made a movie from Breakfast of Champions, with Nick Nolte and Bruce Wiilis. You can watch it on youtube

        • Carsonic

          Whaaaaat. Theeeee. Actualllllll….Fuuuuuuuuck….
          OK, from the trailer, it looks like their heart is in the right place. But…. no. Just, no.

          • Gimmee2

            I rented this several years ago. Worst movie ever. My wife still brings it up. Granted, I never read the book, so those that are into the book might have a greater appreciation for the movie.

          • Carsonic

            I love the book (obviously) and cannot come close to imagining how they would successfully translate it to film. The book is all about Vonnegut’s writing style and life experiences and pacing and word choices and it would be like trying to make a piece of origami that represents the song “Bohemian Rhapsody” or something.

          • DCJ1

            I had the same problem with Slaughterhouse Five, and that was much closer to mainstream.

      • GrizzlyB

        Listen:
        Shout-out for Breakfast of Champions, by far and away my favorite book. I feel like it affected the way I think, maybe too much, and perhaps not necessarily for the better. And so on.

        Five other books I came up with that I like (disclaimer: I’m pretty into YA):
        Looking for Alaska by John Green
        The Great Gatsby
        The Little Prince
        The Death of Jim Loney by James Welch
        Thirteen Reasons Why by Jay Asher (note that I’ve never watched the Netflix series, but I understand it’s melodramatic nonsense that’s pretty unfaithful to the book)

        • Carsonic

          With 3 teen girls in the house, we have lots of John Green novels floating around. He’s a good writer. I’m currently reading his latest, Turtles All The Way Down, and it’s pretty potent.

          • GrizzlyB

            I’ve had The Fault in Our Stars floating around for a few years without getting around to it, so I’ve only read the one book of his, but I was really impressed with the way he captured the voices of his characters. Also, the way he identified a central theme and built on it subtly, which a lot of authors have a weird amount of trouble with, imo (in Looking for Alaska, it was basically, “can you truly understand another person?”). He’s not an amazing prosaist or anything, but he identifies what he wants to convey and does so effectively, I think.

      • gnasses

        Edith Wharton, YES! House of Mirth is great.

        Have you read Zora Neale Hurston’s Their Eyes Were Watching God? That book and the forward in the edition I read (about the use of the word “Nigger” in her contemporary black community) truly changed my state of consciousness.

        • Carsonic

          My wife has that on her list. I’ll have to add it to mine!

          • gnasses

            Modern Fiction by Women Writers was one of my very favorite college classes.

        • Steven_Searls

          Great book by Hurston. Very underrated author.

    • T. Jensen

      I’m going to cheat a little and say series instead of books – In no particular order –

      Alvin Maker Series – Orson Scott Card (would easily be my first if the last book or two was a bit different and if he would ever actually finish the series. I think he wrote himself into a corner and can’t finish it)
      LoTR – Tolkien
      Farseer Trilogy – Robin Hobb (though I like all the books in the Farseer World)
      Mistborn Trilogy – Brandon Sanderson
      Dresden Files – Jim Butcher

      • Carsonic

        Loved the Alvin Maker series! Also, I really should have put the Harry Potter series on my Hon. Ment. list. It starts off compelling, but quaint, and as Rowling’s writing matures ends up compelling, engrossing, moving and utterly enjoyable.

      • Drewredux

        I recently read The Passages Trilogy. If you like post-apocalyptic stuff, it isn’t too bad.

        It has real strong stretches, but you have to abide some ponderous story lines, too.

        • T. Jensen

          I really liked the passages just not enough to re-read them. I’ve read all the above (with the exception of Dresden because I only discovered him a few years ago) at least 3 times through some even more lol.

        • Kush-Lash

          Great series

      • T. Jensen

        Other people have mentioned honorable mentions so I’ll throw some out there too

        Larry Correia – his worlds are all fast paced fun. Son of a black sword has the potential to be a great series.
        Louis Lamour – His sackett books were awesome as a kid. My grandpa gave my brother and me a box full of them. IMO he is the western author.
        Patrick Rothfuss – In the name of the wind might be the best written book I’ve ever read but the sequel dropped slightly and its been YEARS and book 3 still isn’t out.
        Joe Abercromibie – Gritty beserker story.
        Stephen E Ambrose – Great history reads
        Naomi Novak – Awesome dragon stories.
        William Goldman – Princess Bride
        Robert Jordan – wheel of time is great if a bit long winded
        Elizabeth Moon – Deeds of Paks is great
        Dan Wells – Great serial killer books

        • Drewredux

          The Liberation Trilogy by Rick Atkinson is fantastic, if we’re including non-fiction.

          An Army at Dawn won the Pulitzer.

          • T. Jensen

            Thanks! I’ll add that to my list.

        • JMac

          You are speaking my language! I love most of these books. To add to them:

          Gentleman Bastards – Scott Lynch
          Riyria – Michael J Sullivan
          Demon Cycle – Peter V Brett
          Mark Lawrence – If you like the darker bloodier stuff

          • T. Jensen

            I’ve only read the demon cycle. The first book Warded man was great. I met peter brett shortly after reading it at worldcon in Reno. But overall I thought the series dragged a little, I would have preferred a trilogy. Fun world and story though!

    • Rob Rooney

      It is odd, but it seems I don’t read very many one-off books (in fiction). Almost everything I read tends to be part of multiple books in a series in one way or another. I think this has been the case for most of my life as I have always favored a larger ‘epic’ scope with stories in books.

      With that in mind:

      The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant – Stephen R Donaldson (10 books total) Better than Tolkien in my book
      Foundation Series – Isaac Asimov (6 or 7 books)
      The Dark Tower – Stephen King (Not sure how many it is now and he lost his way in spots)
      Dune – Frank Herbert and others (a whole bunch) I haven’t read them all all, but most of them
      A Song of Ice and Fire – George RR Martin (6 books so far, maybe?) This is more a recent discovery

      • bradley

        Dune is tremendous.

        • Rob Rooney

          It has gotten a bit watered-down with all the sequels/prequels/interquels they have pushed out in the last 10 years, but Frank Herbert was just amazing.

          • Carsonic

            Whipping Star is a tight little book that was great.

          • bradley

            Dosadi Experiment, sort of a sequel to Whipping Star, is real good. After a court trial, the losing attorney is put to death.

          • bradley

            Dune was so good he couldn’t equal it. But I enjoyed Frank’s others, especially Chapter House. Haven’t read any of his son’s bools.

          • gnasses

            Agree. Loved Dune, disappointed by all the sequels.

      • Carsonic

        Man, I LOVED the first 2 Covenant books, but then it started to feel formulaic and trying-too-hard, so I gave up. Also loved the Dune series.

        • Rob Rooney

          The second Chronicles was awesome, it may be worth a reading – it moved away from formula. The last set of 4 (finished recently) were still good and wrapped things up nicely. I first read them in high school and they have always stuck with me.

          • Piglet62

            I have to disagree a bit. The middle two books of the Last Chronicles were dynamite, but I personally found the ending rushed and it didn’t really resonate with me.

          • Rob Rooney

            It worked for me, for whatever reason. I see your point, but I just don’t know where else you could have gone from there, and it felt okay for me. After any long series it is so hard to wrap it up in a way that can meet your expectations that are built up over 10.5 books (I do count Gildenfire as half a book).

            I was also okay with the ending for the Second Chronicles as the end of the series (and honestly always felt that would be it), but was also glad to visit The Land again.

            I think when you have a long-running series of books (or movies or tv shows or anything), what I really have come to want is for the ending to not suck. It doesn’t have to be great, but just not suck. It might be a low bar, but I have enjoyed things more after setting it!

          • Piglet62

            Yeah, I get that, its not like I could have done better. But Fatal Revenant and Against All Things Ending were just SO good for me it was a let down. YMMV, of course.

          • Yahmule

            Bad endings are so commonplace. No wonder a lot of good works of fiction have been engineered backwards.

      • Drewredux

        I can’t believe HBO beat George RR Martin home.

        I was waaaay into that series, but the layoff has been tediously long and I’ve pretty much lost interest.

        • Rob Rooney

          Martin has too many irons in the fire and that has kept him from concentrating on one thing or another. Television can’t take a year off, so I figured they would grind ahead of him.

          The thing is the show got me into the books, so I would watch the shows first and then read the appropriate books as they finished that part in the show. That kept the show spoiler-free (relatively) and then I could concentrate on the books and the details. It has really helped me enjoy the books and show for what they are.

          • Drewredux

            I was reading them before HBO. So I decided to save watching HBO until the book is done. Now I’m in limbo. It sucks.

        • T. Jensen

          Don’t start Rothfuss’s series then. I swear he wants book three to be absolutely perfect (which is impossible)

          As for GRRM i doubt he actually finishes the series, I wouldn’t be surprised if he just keeps telling people he’s working on it…

          • Rob Rooney

            I was going to start with Rothfuss’s series soon but maybe I will wait.

          • DCJ1

            Loved the first Rothfuss book, started the second and realized it had been so long that I need to reread the first, so I just set them aside until the third book comes out. I try not to read a series unless it is completed: Nicholas Monsarrat passed away before finishing his Master Mariner books, leaving the hero Mathew Lawe condemned to wander the seas forever, and leaving me condemned to wonder how it ended…

          • T. Jensen

            I would the first book was published in 2007, 2nd in 2011. So its been 7 years and he is still not done.

            Its definitely worth the read but it would be a lot better to read if/when the 3rd comes out.

      • gnasses

        I don’t have as much pleasure reading time as I used to but am a Sci-fi junkie.

        Anything by:
        Neal Stephenson
        William Gibson
        Neal Asher (hugely underrated and still churning them out!)
        Philip K Dick

        I also adore little known but prolific author John Dalmas whose stuff is out of print mostly but is mostly sci-fi and fantasy fiction with a military and philosophical bent. My mom bought me most of his books in HS when i was into them and I have read a sizable fraction to one or both children and my daughter has read and re-read quite a few on her own.

        GRR Martin is good but I almost prefer his Wild Cards work as author and editor to ASOIAF (Game of Thrones) that has brought him fame and fortune.

        And just putting this out there, but JK Rowling is an overrated hack. Feel free to disagree, but reading her books to my daughter was incredibly painful.

        • Rob Rooney

          Neal Stephenson writes some amazing stuff, as does Gibson. I may have to check out some of your other suggestions if I ever have time. That is my biggest problem when people suggest good things to read – having the time to do it!

          • gnasses

            Same.

          • Steven_Searls

            Read American Gods. Good intro to Stephenson.

          • Carsonic

            Gaiman?

          • Steven_Searls

            Yep. My bad

        • WhirlingDervish

          If you read JK Rowling as a children’s book author with Mary Sue characters, you can get into the right frame of mine. My 4yro loves the dialogs and descriptions of the fantastic… reading it with a more adult eye shows the flaws and inconsistencies.

          • gnasses

            Exactly. Kids books. I just know way too many adults who say her HP series are great books and I had to engage in a pre-emptive strike. Many people seem ever so slightly sub-literate these days.

        • Carsonic

          Wow, sorry you feel that way about Rowling. Her first book was definitely raw and got by basically on plot. But by book 4 I felt she had really matured, with much more nuance and dexterity. And when we got the 7th book in the mail on the day it was released, I read it out loud to the family in 4 days, and every one of us was, by turns, exhilarated and gutted by the experience. And we are a family of book readers, with my wife having read probably twice what most of us put together have read and having gotten the kids to read Shakespeare, Austen, Hugo, Fitzgerald, Walker and many more. Obviously, everyone has a right to their own responses to writing, but I just had to share a counterpoint to your criticism.

          • Carsonic

            Edited to remove obnoxious braggy bits.

          • Yahmule

            Boo. That wasn’t obnoxious, it was endearing. This is why editing should be left to professionals.

          • Carsonic

            Lol!

          • Yahmule

            I haven’t read the series, but I think she’s one of the smartest people on Twitter.

        • T. Jensen

          I liked Potter but have to agree, I just think there are much better stories. Of course its not really her fault, I’m 99% sure the majority of the series was ghost written or at least co-written. It was also not well planned out, re-reading the series you can see a ton of flaws/issues and almost no foreshadowing.

          I really disliked book 7.

          Having said that I really appreciate what the books have done for reading. I know a lot of kids that read voraciously now and its all due to those books. I do however like the movies and am taking my wife (a big fan) to Harry Potter Orlando world next month.

          • Carsonic

            You guys will have fun. Universal is kind of annoying in that they have split the HP experience into both parks, so you have to buy a dual-park pass. But if you enjoy that world, they’ve done a really great job in re-creating it. Warning: the ratio of rides/entertainment to shopping opportunities is very low. (That is, lots of the latter, not so much of the former. But the atmosphere is perfect.)

          • T. Jensen

            Its a quick trip. We get there Wed night late and leave Saturday early (first trip without kids!!!!!!!) We were thinking of doing 1 park on Thursday and one on Friday to save money (which means not riding the express) is the $100 saved worth it or should I splurge?

          • Carsonic

            Tough call. It’s a fun little ride/experience. But probably not worth 100 bucks, especially considering what you’ll be paying for food, souvenirs, etc. And the line can get suuuuper long, too.

          • BlackKnigh

            I enjoyed the Potter books when I began reading them. I was spending time with 3 boys who had a single Mom at the time. Once a month or more I would connect with them. The boys really liked the books. They thought it was cool when I began reading them. I had gone through about 2 books when Mom began reading them for the first time. When books 6 and 7 came out – it was a family affair about how fast they could read those books.
            I was spending time at the school with the middle son when he was really concerned that his friend see the 4th book and read some sections of it. He said “This is really important!” We ended up over at his friend’s house when Rob showed him that info.
            Then we put the books aside and played some tackle football. I wondered about the wisdom of that for me as I was 50 at the time. 1998. I didn’t end up with any broken bones. And we had a lot of fun!

          • T. Jensen

            Which is why I really appreciate them. They were Ender’s game and the Hobbit (my intros) to millions of kids/families.

        • Drewredux

          Have you any Electric Dreams on Amazon Prime? It is sort of their Philip Dick themed version of Black Mirror.

          • Rob Rooney

            It was not bad. I watched the whole series and some are better than others, but overall I enjoyed it. I don’t think it is as good as Black Mirror, but still enjoyable.

          • gnasses

            Wife and I are saving that one for a binge watch one of these weekends. We generally watch one show episode after kids are in bed, but she had one too many nightmares after Black Mirror so we are stalled out on the most recent season.

        • Piglet62

          If you like sci-fi, and haven’t read Richard Morgan’s Altered Carbon trilogy, you should. It’s awesome.

          • gnasses

            Very good series! I also thoroughly enjoyed the TV series and felt like it held up.

        • GrizzlyB

          I don’t know that I would describe Rowling as a “hack”, but I definitely find her a mediocre writer, especially for the most (financially) successful writer ever. I actually stopped reading at Goblet of Fire when I thought the series was becoming overplayed (because even at a young age, I was a contrarian hipster like that). One thing I point to in saying that was that I read Goblet of Fire when it came out, and it took 10-year-old me two days to get through a 700+ page book. I mean, the books are very accessible, which I’m sure had as much to do with their popularity as anything, but there’s absolutely no nuance to them. I probably shouldn’t say too much, because I obviously last read her 18 years ago when I was an elementary student, but that’s how I remember it.

    • Jason

      Anything by Ivan Doig is good. I really like his trilogy of life on the Rocky Mountain Front. Bucking the Sun, which was about the construction of Fort Peck Dam was also very good.

      • Drewredux

        My dad is a huge Doig fan.

      • Andrew

        Are you a fellow fly fisherman? I had a great day yesterday chasing wild cutthroat trout in Northern ID. I’ve heard of Gierach but have never read anything I’ll have to check that out.

        • Drewredux

          You ever hit the Miracle Mile right around tax day?

          • Andrew

            I have not but the google search you prompted makes me think I need to one day. Most my experience is in eastern WA/northern Id and some in the black hills, but do have plans to hit some of the famous waters in the Missoula area this year. Is around tax time the right time to hit it or is there an abdundance of weekend warriors that just blew their irs checks on gear they couldn’t afford?

          • Drewredux

            Most the time, there is a confluence between a lot of factors right around that time make it ideal.

            Your average fish, on account of massive amounts of fresh water shrimp is 18”, and if you find a hole, it’s just fishing paradise. It’s a pretty even mix of Browns at Cutts.

            It’s also suitably obscure and sparsely fished that time of year (it can be gloomy, windy and chilly). The fishing, however, is sublime.

          • Drewredux

            Floating the South Fork outside Idaho Falls is also productive and breathtaking.

          • Andrew

            I’ve heard good things about that area my dad covers that area for his job and I know he’s got a few offers from coworkers to show us some good water if we ever head down that way.

          • Jason

            Rock Creek is definitely worth your time.

        • Jason

          Yes I am. Love fishing north Idaho. He has some great books, I don’t think you can go wrong with any of them. I got to meet him many years ago in Fort Collins, right after he wrote Sex, Death, and Fly Fishing.

          • mikewyd

            Being from Wyoming and a former fishing guide, I have every book Gierach has written. Great humour and insight into the human condition.

          • Jason

            Where did you guide?

          • mikewyd

            Green, New Fork, Wyoming Range and wind Rivers

          • Jason

            Id love to fish the upper Green, I’ve never spent any too there other than driving through. The Sweetwater and upper Powder are on the bucket list as well.

          • mikewyd

            The Green is awesome all the way down to Fontenelle Reservoir. Below Fontenelle, the lake trout run all the way up to the dam from Flaming Gorge Reservoir, to spawn. Float that with BIG streamers and sink tip line, and hang on. Hard to land them, some must be at least 30 lbs. Also, hit the upper Wind River below Dubois down to the Reservation line. Have to ask permission, but some seriously big browns and rainbows. Also, float the Big Horn from the mouth of Wind River Canyon down through Thermopolis, big rainbows and browns, as well.

    • Steven_Searls

      Too many books to name.

      Fave Foreign Authors: Virginia Woolf, Roberto Bolano, Jorge Luis Borges, WG Sebald, Ian McEwen, Haruki Murakami, Camus, Malraux, David Mitchell, Tolkien, Kafka, China Miéville, Stieg Larrson, etc.

      US List would be too long to bother with.

      • bradley

        Really liked Borges.

        • Steven_Searls

          Me too.

    • DCJ1

      Being a bibliophile from the moment I could read, there’s no way I can ever come up with a short list — the office in my last house had a 15′ wall with a 12′ peak that was filled floor to ceiling with a custom built bookcase, and I still didn’t have enough room for my books. Our new place doesn’t have space for bookcases (yet) so they’re all still packed in boxes, completely filling a 4′ x 10′ storage closet.

      That said, a few of my latest authors & reads:

      Iain M. Banks — The Culture series
      N. K. Jemisin — The Broken Earth cycle
      Malka Older — Infomocracy, Null States (really interesting novels about micro-democracy and information technology)
      P. J. O’Rourke
      Cixin Lui — (China’s leading SF writer — very reminiscent of writer like Bova and Bear)

      • T. Jensen

        We switched almost completely to kindle. I’ll buy a hardback of a series I love just to complete the series etc or to get an author signature but our house just isn’t big enough. I have an entire wall top to bottom full of books (that’s after culling the non-keepers a few years back) and over 700 on the kindle…

        My wife is on a declutter/minimalist kick and has a rule in our house that is “1 item in 1 item out”(I have to sneak books in now).

        • DCJ1

          I appreciate Kindles and iBooks for long trips (pack lots of titles, no-one can see the garish cover of the trashy novel) but I love the tactile feel of a book. My wife is also on the minimalist kick as well, and want to get rid of my library. I meanwhile am plotting for where the new built-in bookcases will go. I’m looking forward to seeing how it turns out. The point in my favor is my son is coming of an age where he is beginning to read voraciously, and I saved us $50 because I had all five books of the Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy trilogy handy…

          • T. Jensen

            I thought I would be the same way but with my paperwhite (backlit screen) reading is way more enjoyable to me. My two main reading times are lunch and before bed, both of those are difficult with paper books but super convenient with the kindle. I don’t have to figure out a way to hold the book open while holding a taco or turn a lamp on at night.

        • Rob Rooney

          There is a downside to electronic books in that they tend to build up and you don’t really see it. The next thing you know your Kindle has 200 books on it you want to read!!

          I have been moving to electronic media over the last few years (books and comics), so it does help on space. It still seems like I buy a lot of books anyway as some items (particularly art books) don’t translate as well.

          • Sparks

            Another downside is there’s no thrill to the hunt in a used bookstore for electronic books. I’m not near the reader she is, but a fave pastime is visiting one of several used book stores we have here in town and trying to find that hidden gem of a book that someone else has finally decided to let go.

            Plus the battery life on a paper book is way better than electronic. 🙂

          • T. Jensen

            That is the only thing I miss about paper books but most of my used bookstores closed anyway 🙁

            It was always fun finding that gem that you didn’t own yet.

            One thing I hated about paper back books is the fact that they go out of publication. I can’t wait for authors/publishers to start publishing their older books as ebooks.

          • Sparks

            We have several here that my wife seems pretty keen on. I can understand though, why it would be tough to keep a business like that open. We have a theory about one of the stores – the owner is this little old lady who is always there. We figure she’s independently wealthy and just loves to toil away her days surrounded by books and people who share a passion for them.

          • T. Jensen

            Wouldn’t that be a dream job? Unfortunately I really don’t think those are very profitable, your scenario or something very similar is probably the only reason most used stores are open.

            Back in college, I used to go to the dollar store and buy new crappy hardbacks (usually something off of Oprah’s list) for a buck. Then go trade them into a local used store and get $3 or $4 store credit. I got quite a few of my books through that trick.

          • Yahmule

            I love and miss used book stores. They used to be everywhere. I would sometimes buy a copy of a book I’d already read just because I liked the cover more on the newly discovered copy.

          • Carsonic

            This is what the phrase “used book store” makes me think of.

          • Yahmule

            I’m perfectly capable of creating impressive stacks of unread physical books. I’m so backed up currently, I’m pretty much only browsing now when my wife and I drop into Barnes and Noble so she can grab the latest from one of her favorite writers.

    • gobroncos

      Trump’s top 5 works of fiction:
      1) CNN
      2) New York Times
      3) MSNBC News
      4) The Washington Post
      5) Actual Facts

      • mikewyd

        How many times can we upvote this?

        • gobroncos

          I gave you mine.

    • royalwithcheese

      A few for consideration:

      Catch-22
      Fierce Invalids Home from Hot Climates
      1984
      Zen and the Art of Motercycle Maintenance
      Sula
      Beloved
      100 Year’s of Solitude
      Love in the Time if Cholera
      Bonfire of the Vanities

      • Andrew

        Have you read any other of Tom Robbins stuff? Fierce Invalids, Jitterbug Perfume, and Skinny Legs and all are all great and his other stuff is all passable.

        • royalwithcheese

          I’ve read almost all of his fiction. Fierce Invalids barely beats out Skinny Legs and All, IMO.

        • Carsonic

          Jitterbug Perfume is amazing.

          • Andrew

            Went through a phase in college where I read all his novels in like 6 months. Jitterbug Perfume is definitely one of my favorites pretty sure I’ve got a copy somewhere might be time for a reread.

          • Carsonic

            Yeah, I just reread it last summer after 20 years. Still as wondrous.

      • Russ

        Catch-22 is maybe my all-time #1. Also, anything by Kurt Vonnegut.

    • Yahmule

      I’ve found what I read has changed dramatically. From five years old to my late 20’s, I read fiction over 90% of the time. That ratio flipped once I hit about 30. I also went from reading about five books a month to 1-2 books a year after the internet had a long enough chance to degrade my attention span. I had to consciously get back into reading physical books again.

      • Carsonic

        Same here. Around last summer I decided that my after work decompression time would be better filled reading books than playing match-3 games on my phone. Especially so I can feel like I’m keeping up with my kids.

        • Yahmule

          Steam helpfully carries a running total of the hours you’ve spent on a game. Doing the actual math can be genuinely horrifying.

      • Drewredux

        Military history, particularly WW II, has become my second great interest next to the NFL in mid-life. Though my reading volume has dwindled, in general, I’m usually pursuing that interest if I am reading these days.

        The psychology of war fascinates me to no end.

        • mikewyd

          Have you read Churchill’s four volume history of WWII? Riveting

        • bradley

          Brothers, Rivals, Victors by Jonathan Jordan is good. About Patton, Ike and Omar Bradley

        • Yahmule

          I’ve read a pretty fair number of history books. Antony Beevor has written some excellent books about WWII. The most gripping history book I ever read was Conquistador by Buddy Levy. I thought Citizens by Simon Schama was outstanding, but really long. Tom Holland wrote some really interesting stuff about ancient Rome and Greece. Rubicon was probably my favorite. Adrian Goldsworthy’s books about Rome are so intricately researched.

          • FarAwayBroncoFan

            Goldsworthy is good author. Ive read a few of his books, and just recently finished Pax Romana.

        • gnasses

          Cobra II, by NY Time war correspondent Mike Gordon and Marine General Bernard Trainor is a great book about the US invasion of Iraq.

    • Andrew

      The stand is one of my favorites I even think the mini-series holds up made my wife watch it on Netflix a few years ago. It’s hard for me to do a top book list but some of my favorites are

      Skinny Legs and All by Tom Robbins
      The Stand by stephen King
      Jubil Sackett by Louis Lamour
      Lamb by Christopher Moore

      Lately I’ve been reading more of the crime thriller type stuff with authors like Nelson Demille, Lee Child, and David Baldacci. If you have only seen the Jack Reacher movies trust that’s Lee Childs books are much better and Tom Cruise was and unexplainable miscast for a 6’5 250 pound badass.

      • T. Jensen

        Jubal Sackett was by far my favorite Louis Lamour book and I loved them all (especially the Sackett series).

        • Andrew

          I loved that book as a kid and going through some stuff my parents had of mine I found it last year and ended reading it again definitely one of his best stories.

        • Jason

          Last of the Breed was a great book too.

      • bradley

        For crime thriller, if you like Nelson DeMille, you’ll like Chuck Logan. Skip Hunters Moon, his first, and try The Price of Blood.Peter Bowen’s Gabriel DuPres books are real good and different.
        Roger Crais is real good most of the time. Try The Watchman.

        • Andrew

          I’ll have to check them out it’s definitely one of those genre’s that seems to be done well by a lot of authors.

          • bradley

            Also, Randy Wayne White’s Doc Ford series.

          • bradley

            For a change of pace, try the Chet and Bernie series by Spencer Quinn. Chet and Bernie are partners in a PI firm. Chet is a 100 pound dog who narrates the stories. Good plots and Chet is a lot of fun.

      • royalwithcheese

        I love Skinny Legs and All. Almost included it on my list.

      • Drewredux

        The Charm School is probably my favorite Demille. I read that on the way to basic training.

        I have liked the Reacher stuff I’ve read.

        The guy that wrotesome mean thrillers is Stephen Hunter. He died, I think. Dirty White Boys and Point of Impact (Hollywoodized in M Wahlburg’s Shooter) are both really good.

        I didn’t know what to make of Lamb. I thought it was well written….and a little creepy.

        • bradley

          Plum Island is my favorite DeMille but I think Charm School is his best. I recently re-read it for maybe the 8th time and was again amazed at how well written it is.
          Iv’e probably read Plum Island 15 times.

        • bradley

          As a veteran, most states will now mark your driver’s license that you’re a Vet. Gets you some discounts here and there (Ace Hardware e.g. My local pot store gives 15% off).
          If you get pulled over for something, the cop might go a little easier.

          ps. Take your DD 214 to DMV to get it done.

      • Yahmule

        My wife laughed hard when they cast Cruise in that movie.

    • Prater2Beadles4Six

      Stick to sprots!.
      I don’t get to read much but a few favorites are hitchhikers guide to the galaxy, Candide, how soccer explains the world, and Hustler (for the articles)

      • Andrew

        I need to check out hitchhikers guide the movie is pretty good.

      • bradley

        The Long Dark Tea Time of the Soul by Doug Adams is better than Hitchhikers Guide, IMO.

        • Prater2Beadles4Six

          I actually recently found a copy of Long Dark Tea Time of the Soul on cassette and listened to the whole thing in my car on a day I had a lot of driving for work. It was pretty great. fortunately my 99′ 4Runner has a tape deck and CD player.

      • Yahmule

        Candide sure doesn’t read like it’s 260 years old.

    • FarAwayBroncoFan

      For historical fiction fans, Conn Iggulden and Simon Scarrow are both good authors. And Wallace Bream wrote one of my favorite historical fiction novels, Eagle in the Snow.

      For those that enjoy Vietnam era books (And there are a ton, of course), but I’ve really enjoyed The 13th Valley and Sand in the Wind.

      Lastly, while not fiction, the Forgotten Soldier, by Guy Sajer, is excellent.

      • bradley

        Shogun by James Clavell is tremendous historical fiction. Japan, 1600. All the major characters were besed on real ones. And it’s a damn spell binder if ever there was one.

        • FarAwayBroncoFan

          Agreed. Read it, a long time ago.

        • gobroncos

          Yeah, that was great. The second one was ok, but not nearly as good.

          I played this game called Nobunaga’s Ambition on the original NES when I was a kid. It was a strategy game about 1500’s Japan. You had to unite all of Japan starting with one fiefdom. Now that was an educational game in so many ways.

        • Carsonic

          Probably not as good as this though.

    • Carsonic

      Any Terry Pratchett fans here? I couldn’t single out one book to put on the list, but as series go, Discworld is definitely my favorite.

    • gobroncos

      In no particular order.

      Siddhartha – Herman Hesse
      Stranger in a Strange Land – Robert Heinlein
      The Celestine Prophecy – James Redfield
      Dead Poet Society – N.H. Kleinbaum. Read the book in one day and for some reason someone was cutting onions nearby.
      The Stand – Steven King

      As far as series go:
      Wheel of Time – Robert Jordan (until he kicked the bucket, Sanderson isn’t as good as Jordan).
      Game of Thrones, A song of Ice and Fire – George RR Martin
      Dune – James Herbert, The first two books really. The third was ok and I couldn’t make it through the 4th so never continued.
      The Foundation Series – Isaac Asimov
      Lord of the Rings – JRR Tolkien, Book two had some hard parts to get through though.

      Then there’s a lot of stuff I read as a kid that were good then, but I think I probably might not enjoy as much. A lot of that has to do with what age group the target audience is. A few of those are:

      The Chronicles of the Cheysuli – Jennifer Roberson
      Xanth Series – Piers Anthony
      Sword Dancer Series – Jennifer Roberson

      Similarly, like a lot of you, the JK Rowling series, Harry Potter, didn’t do it for me. I didn’t read it until I was well past college and it wasn’t that good. I could understand how 10 year old’s would like it. It was predictable and the writing simple. I only read the first three. What really got me was that there were so many ADULTS lauding it. It’s a book for kids. Don’t claim it as amazing writing if you’re an adult.

      • bradley

        Siddhartha – Herman Hesse
        Stranger in a Strange Land – Robert Heinlein

        Good Ones.

    • gnasses

      Now that I’m home near the bookshelves, realized I forgot to shout out for Hugo Award winning Paolo Bacigalupi, who’s most famous is The Wind-up Girl. Some of his work is more YA level, but still powerful and interesting, like Ship Breaker and the fantasy novella The Alchemist.

  • Nick

    If any of you have been wondering why I haven’t gotten around to extension articles yet, there’s two reasons. One is I’ve had other things to work on, but the other problem is that there’s going to be a lot of moving parts for 2019 that need to be accounted for. Reference this that I wrote last month to review why:

    https://in-thinair.com/2018/05/15/looking-ahead-to-the-broncos-2019-offseason/

    I’m probably going to have to write all of them before I can publish any of them. My hope is that I can rattle these off before training camp starts.

    • Drewredux

      It could be a regular trail of tears next offseason. Like, DT, ES, Barrett, Ray, Stewart…

      Big season, this year. It could be all that stands between the window and a full scale tear down.

      • Nick

        It’s a much bigger gulf from 2019 to 2020. Keenum, DT, Sanders, CHJ, Wolfe, Simmons, and Gotsis all have expiring contracts then.

        • T. Jensen

          Ouch. Man our window is small.

          • Jeremy

            It’s this way across the league. I looked before the draft, and most teams only had a handful (like 3 to 8) veterans signed past 2020.

  • Nick
    • Yahmule

      Cue the stale guards aren’t worth big money takes.

    • G Mik

      Stale Guards are not worth this type of money!

      • Nick

        But a fresh guard like Martin is!

        • G Mik

          In all seriousness they will have a heck of a lot of money tied up on their OLine. Since Prescott is nearly free, they can probably make that work for another 2 years but that’s about it. Unless you say otherwise, mr authority.

          • Nick

            They actually have the 4th highest cap space in 2020 (pre-Martin deal), the year Prescott is slated to be a UFA. They’ll be fine.

      • Yahmule

        Now, fresh guards, mmmwah!

  • Carsonic

    Weird typos throughout, but a nice little interview with Elway about Keenum and Kubiak. http://denver.cbslocal.com/2018/06/11/john-elway-denver-broncos-case-keenum-gary-kubiak/

  • Yahmule

    Marcus Davenport injured a thumb ligament and it will require surgery. They’re acting very optimistic, but this is not a good injury for a pass rusher.

    • Tyler

      Ouch. Not what you want to hear after dropping two first round picks on a guy.

  • Nick

    This smells like they aren’t expecting Mack back any time soon.

    https://twitter.com/AdamSchefter/status/1006300248900341760

    • bradley

      Raiders have a Super Bowl chance??

      • Sparks

        I thought the same thing. The 1st sentence does not go with the 2nd sentence in that tweet at all.

        • sunsetcolors

          The 2nd sentence is past tense. He wanted to play for a contender but gave up on that and took Raider money.

          • bradley

            Was gonna say.

      • Andrew

        I love that they have nothing to show from the window of time they had a good qb and elite pass rusher on rookie deals.

        • Jeremy

          They went 12-3 before Carr went down

          • bradley

            And Musgrave left.

    • WhirlingDervish

      See if Mack wants a “Screw the Raiders” like King took?

  • Drewredux

    Does anybody have a sense of the thinking at S?

    Simmons FS, Stewart SS, Cravens sub-packages?

    Or

    Vise Versa at FS and SS?

    Or

    Simmons FS, Cravens SS, Parks sub-packages, Stewart SoL, for all intents and purposes?

    • SterlingMalloryArcher

      Your first option, I think, though Simmons is still listed as a SS on the roster. That seems strange because I saw him playing deep an awful lot last year, with Stewart up closer to the line.

  • VonSwenson

    I went all the way through all of people’s favourite book choices, and nobody mentioned Daniel Suarez. http://www.daniel-suarez.com/

    He’s written five books; Daemon is the one to start with (Freedom TM is the sequel). These are the most ground-breaking sci-fi I’ve read since William Gibson invented “cyberspace” in Neuromancer.

    • gnasses

      That sounds really good and interestingly complex. A lot of folks seem to have great things to say about it. Might have to interrupt some techie study time for a book binge on that. Thanks for the recommendation!

  • Yahmule

    Okay, here’s a sub-thread. First book you ever read?

    For me it was Call of the Wild, although I had sort of looked through a copy of The Jungle Book we had laying around the house, COTW was the first adult book I read all the way through. My second was White Fang.

    • Kush-Lash

      Where the Wild Things Are

    • bradley

      My 4th grade teacher, Mrs. Dague, got us all into reading. I got into a series of western books about Jim Bridger, Kit Carson, et. al. Also found one about a panther cub in central america and how he survived. I was reading one a night until I ran into White Fang, which took a week. Then Call of the Wild.

      • Kush-Lash

        I was in a 4th/5th grade mix class and during my 4th grade year, Ms. Ahonen had the whole class read The Indian in the Cubard series. My mind was blown away! Best book for a kids imagination. That was the same year 5th graders Mike and Sean jumped me up after school one day. My mom marched me to school the next morning and had all of meet with the principal. They got sent home for the day and I actually felt bad for them. Learned later life at home was not easy for those two and you could see the fear in their eyes that day.

    • Carsonic

      The first novel I remember the title of was, I believe, Brighty of the Grand Canyon. But it also might have been The Hobbit. But before that, the first book I remember reading was Kipling’s Just So Stories. We lived in Maseru, Lesotho for a year, and one of the highlights of my young life was looking out an airplane window and actually seeing the “great, grey-green, greasy Limpopo River, all set about with fever trees.”

    • Random Anonymous Coward

      Vulcan’s Peak by Fenimore Cooper, then Treasure’s Island, by RLS. For some reason I was into nautical themes.

    • mikewyd

      Exactly the same

    • royalwithcheese

      Where the Red Fern Grows

      • bradley

        Gotta love coon hounds.

  • Kush-Lash

    Keeping the literary theme going, I actually just found out the other day you can check out audio books from your local library system… just need an app (https://meet.libbyapp.com/) and library card. The game has officially changed for me! #livingunderarock

    • Yahmule

      That’s really cool.