• Tim

    Guten Tag from Innsbruck, Austria. I have really been enjoying reading the blog while over in Europe, but I regret not being able to participate in these conversations, so I figured I’d weigh in on the book discussion from yesterday. My favorite 5 that I didn’t see mentioned:
    1. Pillars of Earth- Ken Folliet, there is no finer historical fiction. It’s a masterpiece, anything by Folliet is a must read for me
    2. Red Rising trilogy- a fascinating combination of sci fi, mythology, caste system, and policies
    3. Ender’s Game series- I liked the Bean series a lot better but I haven’t read this in a long time
    4. Natchez Burning- a murder mystery that is gripping while diving into the Jim Crow South, one of my favorite periods
    5. Ready Player One- so much better than the movie. This is just a fun, engrossing read.
    Two non fiction books I have to mention
    1. Leonardo Da Vinci by Walter Iaacson, what an interesting man, and has changed the way I see the purpose of questions.
    2. When Breathe Becomes Air- my goodness this is a powerful book about success cut short and life’s meaning at the end of a terminal illness. Have tissues handy
    Thank you to everyone for the recommendations, I added a number to my “to read” list!

    • bradley

      Pillars of Earth- Ken Folliet. Great book.

    • Yahmule

      Pillars of the Earth would be in my top five novels of all time. Educational, inspiring, infuriating and I was wanting more when I reached the final page.

    • Yahmule

      Isaacson also wrote a terrific biography of Benjamin Franklin.

    • MattR

      I completely missed yesterday’s thread so I may be repeating things.

      I enjoyed the shit out of the first half of Ready Player One but felt it came apart a bit after Wade found the first key before recovering to have a decent/good ending. I do agree that overall if was a fun, engrossing read. Have not seen the movie to compare.

      • Rob Rooney

        I found the movie to be a little better in a lot of ways. I read and thoroughly enjoyed Ready Player One, and it helps I am just a couple of years older than Cline and I am 100% the target audience and get basically 100% of the references he throws out, but it really lacks in storytelling and dialog.

        The sequel – Armada – was a weaker version of the same basic story, which seems to be ‘how many references to the pop culture can I fit in’.

  • Carsonic

    I may have posted this in a previous off-season dry spell, but I definitely posted it as a comment to a comment yesterday. The point is, I want to give it a better chance to be seen because it’s highly entertaining. (And also, apologies if everyone remembers it from last time. If there was a last time.)

  • bradley

    Brett Favre broke down how he unintentionally invented the RPO without telling the coaches

    https://ftw.usatoday.com/2018/06/brett-favre-gruden-rpo-run-pass-option-invented-story-video-nfl-offense-camp-packers

    “Brett Favre invented the RPO because he was bored during running plays, and he didn’t wait for the coaching staff’s permission to test it out.”

  • Jeremy

    Yesterday focused mostly on fiction books, anyone with recent non fiction favorites/recommendations?

    • bradley

      Glad you asked.

      Some biographies that are real good are Donovan, about Bill Donovan who ran the OSS during WW II; Truman, about President Truman; Nimitz, about Admiral Chester Nimitz, who took over the U.S. Navy in the Pacific after Pearl Harbor; and The Last Lion, a two volume work about Churchill (unfortunately, Vol II ends about 1941, and the author never finished Vol. III). Washington by Ron Chernow is real good. Amazing how much grief George went through. And I learned that Martha was pretty cool.

      I like WW II books – anything by Cornelius Ryan (The Longest Day and A Bridge Too Far) is good. John Toland’s The Rising Sun, about the war in the Pacific, is real good.
      1942: The Year That Tried Men’s Souls by Winston Groom is a very good account of WWII in 1942, around the globe. Groom has written several other books, including Forrest Gump.

      Human Smoke by Nicholson Baker is a very interesting book on the runup to WWII and on into it. It is an ongoing series of short writings from the time, from newspaper articles to personal letters. Very different, and I got a very different look at the period.

      In the Garden of Beasts by Erik Larson. The story of U.S. Ambassador to Germany in 1933. William E. Dodd, a history professor, is sent by FDR to Berlin (no one else wanted the job). His wife and son and daughter (Martha – 24 and quite liberated) accompany him. At first, they are caught up in the new Germany, but eventually learn of the dark side. This is according to the jacket blurb – I’m just getting into it, but it’s very well written.

      Guns of August by Barbara Tuchman is very good – about the start of WW I, and the first couple months of fighting.

      Wolf Hall by Hilary Mantel. The story of Thomas Crowley becoming an important advisor to Henry VIII during the period when Henry was trying to get free of his first wife so he could marry Anne Boleyn. A good look at the era, even though the subject is not of great historical importance.

      King, Kaiser, Tsar by Catrine Clay. The story of three royal cousins, Georgie, Willy, and Nicky, who grew up to become George V of England; Wilhelm II of Germany; and Nicholas II of Russia. And how the world slid into WW I. (pushed by Willy). Very well written – the author does a real good job of reminding the reader who certain people are as she skips back to England, or to Russia, or back again. A good thing in a book with a cast of hundreds.

      The State Of Jones by Sally Jenkins and John Stauffer tells the story of Jones County, Mississippi, during the Civil War. More specifically, it tells the story of Nathan Knight, a hard scrabble farmer conscripted into the Confederate Army. Knight was never into secession, nor slavery, and didn’t much like being forced into the Army. After the Battle of Corinth, he deserted and waged a war of revolt for the next few years until the Civil War ended. Excellent look at the era.

      The Meadow by James Galvin. The story is about a meadow northwest of Fort Collins, Colorado, but centers on the life story of Lyle Van Waning who lived in the meadow most of his life, from the late 1800’s to the mid 1900’s. Beautifully written, it’s an excellent tale of those days.

      Rabbit Creek Country by Jon Thiem. Another book about the area northwest of Fort Collins, centering on three people, including Josephine Lamb, who lived and ranched in the area from the late 1800’s to the mid 1900’s. Very interesting to those of us who live nearby, but a very good history of the era. Very well written.

      SINNERS: Jesus and His Earliest Followers, by Greg Carey. This isn’t about Jesus so much as it is about the social mores and laws of Jesus’ time. Really interesting.

      The God Particle, by Leon Lederman. Lederman is a particle physicist who won the Nobel in the 90’s. He does a very good job of explaining particle physics to us laymen (did you know that 30 million muons pass through your thumb every second?)

      My Stroke Of Insight by Jill Bolte Taylor is very good. Taylor was a Ph.D. working on brain research at the Harvard Medical Center in the 90’s when, at age 37, she suffered a massive stroke in the left hemisphere of her brain. This is her story, and it’s very well written and fascinating.

      Seabiscuit: An American Legend by Laura Hillenbrand is a great story. Seabiscuit became a champion thoroughbred race horse in the late 30s, as the country was struggling with the depression. He became a favorite of the people. The story is told very well by Hillenbrand, and includes a great look at the times, especially as seen through the eyes of the racing crowd. Seabiscuits owner, Charles Howard, was a very interesting man, as was Tom Smith, the trainer, and Red Pollard, Seabiscuits jockey when he wasn’t injured. Really good book.

      A World Lit Only By Fire, by William Manchester. This is an excellent book by one of my favorite authors (he wrote The Last Lion about Churchill). A look at the transition of Europe from the Dark Ages into the Renaissance.
      1.

      What Hath God Wrought is a very good history of the young United States from about 1815 (or the end of the War of 1812 against Britain) to about 1848 (or the end ot the War With Mexico).

      Carlos Castaneda’s books about Don Juan Matus are awesome. The first is The Teachings of Don Juan; A Yaqui Way of Knowledge. The second is A Separate Reality. Then Journey To Ixtlan, then Tales of Power. There are about twelve altogether. Castaneda spent about 16 years with Don Juan as his apprentice. I can’t recommend these books enough.

      • Carsonic

        William Manchester was amazing. Really sad that he didn’t get to finish his Churchill bio. And have you seen the Wolf Hall series starring Mark Rylance? Brilliant with startlingly beautiful cinematography.

        • bradley

          I haven’t yet read it, but Manchester collaborated with someone to do Vol III of Last Lion. A friend tells me it’s very good.

          • Carsonic

            My wife read it and said it was more like Manchester’s assistant collaborated with someone using his notes, and it just didn’t leap off the page in the same way.

        • bradley

          I just the Wolf Hall series and was pleased to watch a bit of Rylance’s performance.
          Check out the movie Bridge of Spies on youtube. Tom Hanks plays Jim Donovan, a Brooklyn attorney who gets stuck with defending Rudolf Abel, a Russian spy, in the late 50s. Based on a true story, and the movie is excellent. Anyway, Rylance plays Abel and is tremendous. He got several Best Supporting Actor awards, including an Oscar.

          • Carsonic

            Yeah, we liked that one a lot!

      • Jeremy

        Thanks for the list. Any suggestions of best WWII books for someone who hasn’t read/learned much about that era? I’m starting a new job with a longer commute so I’ll have more time to listen to audiobooks.

        • bradley

          My friend Stephen, another WW II buff, told me years ago that, when asked that, he always says “Winds of War and War of Remembrance by Herman Wouk. I thought about that for a second or two and totally agreed. Historical fiction centering on USN Commander Victor Henry, Wouk moves him around the globe like a chess piece. He gets to know FDR, meets Mussolini, Hitler, Churchill, Stalin.
          Winds of War starts in March 39 and ends shortly after Pearl Harbor. War and Remembrance picks up there and goes through the end of the war.
          Wouk is an excellent writer.

        • bradley

          Brothers, Rivals, Victors by Jonathan Jordan is good. About Patton, Ike and Omar Bradley.

        • Drewredux

          An Army at Dawn won the Pulitzer, and its part of a fantastic trilogy.

          The Liberator, by Alex Kershaw, is a phenomenal biography of Felix Sparks, a true Colorado hero.

        • Yahmule

          Antony Beevor’s work is meticulously researched, even handed and unflinching.

        • DCJ1

          The classics are the best in my opinion:
          The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich by William L. Shirer (American journalist and war correspondent)
          Enemy at the Gates by William Craig (the battle for Stalingrad)
          Hilter Moves East by Paul Carrell (a somehwat whitewashed version of Operation Barbossa by a Wehrmact officer)
          Inside the Third Reich by Albert Speer (Speer was a Nazi party official who was sentenced in Nuremburg)
          Spandau by Albert Speer (not WWII, but rather the post-Nuremberg imprisonment of some Nazi officials)

      • gnasses

        Jill Bolte Taylor did a TED talk on her Stroke that is amazing. A couple co-workers who had strokes (one at work when I was the only guy around!) I shared it with also appreciated it. I bet that book is a great read.

        • bradley

          The book is amazing. It reads like a thriller – what’s going to happen next?
          She was working at Harvard Medical researching the brain when she had the stroke one morning while still at home. Her description of what was happening sounded like she had taken LSD.

    • Carsonic

      Being Peace, Thich Nhat Hanh
      Eating Animals, Jonathan Safran Foer
      Bossypants, Tina Fey
      The Underground History of American Education, John Taylor Gatto

    • Jeremy

      Some recent ones I liked include
      Shoe dog (Nike founder)

      Endure (must read for any endurance athlete. Lots of interesting stuff about how the mind and body interplay in this area)

      The sports gene (fascinating book on the interplay between athletics and genetics)

      Being mortal by Atul Gawande

      Homo sapiens and Homo dues

      Everybody lies (of the freakanomics genre, which I’m a sucker for)

      The signal and the noise by nate silver and super forecasting. Two great books on how to make prediction/forecasts.

    • gnasses

      Mentioned the first yesterday in reply about military history books but these are some of the best I have read in the last few years.

      Michael R. Gordon and Bernard E. Trainor – Cobra II: The Inside Story of the Invasion and Occupation of Iraq
      Naomi Klein – The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism
      Chalmers Johnson – The Sorrows of Empire: Militarism, Secrecy, and the End of the Republic
      Elizabeth Wurtzel – Bitch: In Praise of Difficult Women

      • Drewredux

        Double thumbs up on Cobra II.

        The Outpost encapsulates the futility of Afghanistan, if you are interested at all in that conflict.

        • Yahmule

          Did either of you read Generation Kill?

          • Drewredux

            Yep. Also good.

      • Andrew

        Anything by Chalmers Johnson is good I read Blowback and I think another of his. I really enjoyed the Shock Doctrine as well.

    • Drewredux

      The Liberation Trilogy by Rick Atkinson.

    • Andrew

      What’s a Matter with Kansas by Thomas Frank
      Generation Me by Jean Twenge
      Perfectly Legal by David Cay Johhson
      For any NBA fans out there Bill Simmons actually does a great Job with The Book of Basketball.

      • Nick

        Gonna have to disagree on Generation Me. My go to resource on all things generations that I’ve mentioned on here several times is William Strauss and Neil Howe, and their take on Millennials is quite different, and IMO more likely to be accurate in the long run.

        • Andrew

          I haven’t read any other their work, but looking at a few summaries it sounds very interesting I’ll have to check it out. I think Twenge has some good insights overall, but may have had a narrative in her head that she researched towards. That’s the hard think with generational studies it’s easy to over simplify or overgeneralize.

          • Nick

            The main issue I have with Twenge is that her findings lean closer to generalization of young people (narcissism being the big one) that have plagued multiple generations at that age. After all, the Boomers were called the original Me Generation. I find Strauss and Howe to take a more holistic approach that takes note on how generations can be different while still holding similar age traits.

    • Jason

      Undaunted Courage

    • Yahmule

      Conquistador by Buddy Levy – Hernán Cortés defeats the huge and powerful Aztec empire with 508 soldiers, 16 horses and an amazing amount of daring.

      A Savage Factory: An Eyewitness Account of the Auto Industry’s Self-Destruction by Robert J. Dewar – Eye-opening look at the largely self-induced decline of the American automotive industry by a man who was a manager for Ford during the 60’s and 70’s. He waited 25 years to write this book because of fear of reprisal to himself of his family.

      A People’s History of the United States by Howard Zinn – Everybody should read this book.

      Fast Food Nation by Eric Schlosser – Comprehensively researched look at the history of the food industry in America.

      Anything by Carl Sagan, but Demon Haunted World is most applicable to our current situation.

      World War Z by Max Brooks – Forget that crappy CGI movie. Practical advice for when the zombies come for your ass.

      • Alaskan

        Conquistador is a very good book. I wondered how he knew all those details.
        That led to archive.org where I downloaded the book written by Bernal Diaz back when it all happened.
        I thought a 500 year old book would be unreadable, but it was really great.
        Diaz wasn’t a big cheese, he just wrote about what it was like to be with Cortez and fight 130+ battles.

        • Yahmule

          What Cortés accomplished was truly amazing as he took and retook Tenochtitlán. He had the nerve to disobey Diego Velázquez and leave Cuba for North America without permission; the diplomacy skills to enlist local tribes who hated the Aztecs; savvy enough to recognize and play on Montezuma’s superstitions; he quickly saw the incredible technological and psychological advantage horses, previously unseen on the continent, gave his soldiers; the incredible nerve to scuttle his ships once deciding to attack the empire to prevent desertions; defeated and repurposed the army of Pánfilo Narvez sent by Velázquez to thwart him; resisted Montezuma’s attempts to bribe him with unbelievable riches; got his skull cracked open and was written off for dead.

          Not to say he, or any of the conquistadors, were wonderful people. They stole and melted down priceless gold artifacts in a cultural loss that rivals the burning of the Library of Alexandria. All to fund wars they would lose to England anyway.

          I thought Kim McQuarrie’s The Last Days of the Incas was an interesting companion piece to Conquistador and read them back to back.

          https://www.amazon.com/Last-Days-Incas-Kim-MacQuarrie/dp/0743260503/ref=asap_bc?ie=UTF8

          • Rob Rooney

            To add a little to this, try the book ‘Guns, Germs and Steel’ by Jared Diamond. It traces the evolution of human society to ask (and answer) why the Spanish were the ones who ended up in America and why it wasn’t the other way around. European success in the world culminated with the conquest of the Aztecs in the New World and the book details the reasons that the Europeans were the ones who ended up on top instead of the Africans or Asians or Americans (pre-Columbus). A really good read.

          • Yahmule

            The epidemic diseases they brought to the New World certainly greased the skids for our English ancestors.

          • Alaskan

            “1491” does a nice job of explaining how diseases did the heavy lifting when it came to wiping out the native populace in North America.

          • Drewredux

            Diamond was a guest lecturer in one of my college classes a few days. Learned a lot.

          • Alaskan

            Absolutely agree about the Last Days of the Incas.
            That is one of most interesting history books I have ever read.
            It explains how Pizarro showed up with a small group of guys and conquered the mightiest empire in the New World, with some help from smallpox and a civil war. They have his skeleton on display in the cathedral in Lima. They know it is his because of the many stab wounds that his Spanish enemies inflicted when they killed him.

    • Nick

      Just mentioned Strauss and Howe downthread. Their generational take on history helps to explain why the human race repeatedly fails to learn lessons from history.

      As an amateur Supreme Court junkie I really liked The Brethren by Bob Woodward, and John Paul Stevens’s book Five Chiefs was also another great account of SCOTUS history direct from the source.

    • Rob Rooney

      Thinking Fast and Slow – Daniel Kahneman
      Anything by Malcolm Gladwell (anything he wrote, not a book called anything)
      Should We Eat Meat – Vaclav Smil (it is a little dense to read but very interesting)
      The Black Swan – Nassim Taleb
      The Drunkard’s Walk – Leonard Mlodinow
      The Power of Habit – Charles Duhigg
      The Shallows – Nicholas Carr
      We Are Anonymous (Hacker Group) – Parmy Olson
      Ghost in the Wires – Kevin Mitnick
      April 1865 – The Month That Saved America – Jay Winik

      Sorry, I don’t read tons of history or biography ( I consume it through other means, like TV!) but tend towards other things in my non-fiction.

      • Jeremy

        You seem like the first who shares my taste in books. I also loved thinking fast and slow (thinking about rereading) and the power of habit.

        What are your thoughts on Nassim Taleb? I listened to about 2/3rds of his most recent book and found parts of it interesting and insightful, but I struggled to get through parts because it seemed repetitive and the author’s smugness was off the charts.

        Based on the titles of his other books it seems they will again be repetitive with the same concepts being explained over and over. That all said, do you think I should give another one of his books a try?

        • Rob Rooney

          I really enjoyed The Black Swan and didn’t get a smugness from it, at least not too much (there is a little). I found it very interesting and engaging. I can’t listen to non-fiction books for the most part as my mind tends to wander and I feel like I get more by reading them (and retain more). I would recommend The Black Swan highly. He does kind of beat it into your head, you you may be better off if you skim some of it.

          I just started Skin in The Game, so I haven’t reached anything too bad in it.

          If you want arrogant, try Chaos Monkeys (it is about Silicon Valley). The author makes the point he hates Taleb and the whole book is full of arrogant acts and deeds.

    • T. Jensen

      Sports biographies
      Kiss it good bye – John Moody
      Pistol – Mark Kriegel

      War stories
      Unbroken – Laura hildebrand
      Any book by Stephen Ambrose (Band of Brothers is probably most famous)
      Escape from Sobibor – Richard Rashke

      Self Help/Other
      7 Habits of Highly – Stephen Covey
      Freakonomics
      As a Man thinketh – James Allen
      Mans search for meaning – Victor Frankl
      Harry Truman’s Excellent Adventure – Matthew Algeo

    • Drewredux

      Incognito: The Secret Lives of the Brain, David Eagleton

      • T. Jensen

        seems a little too soon for his biography, did he officially retire last year?

    • JMac

      Misbehaving: The Making of Behavioral Economics by Richard Thaler

    • RSH

      Anything written by Bryan A. Garner
      365 Thank Yous: The Year a Simple Act of Daily Gratitude Changed My Life by John Kralik
      Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis by J.D. Vance
      Standing for Something: 10 Neglected Virtues That Will Heal Our Hearts and Homes by Gordon B. Hinckley
      Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption by Bryan Stevenson
      The Federalist Papers by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay
      1776 by David McCullough
      The Nine: Inside the Secret World of the Supreme Court by Jeffrey Toobin
      Bowling Alone: The Collapse and Revival of American Community by Robert D. Putnam
      Blood, Sweat & Chalk: The Ultimate Football Playbook: How the Great Coaches Built Today’s Game by Tim Layden
      Letters from a Nut by Ted L. Nancy
      Reading People by Anne Bogel
      Tell Me How It Ends: An Essay in 40 Questions by Valeria Luiselli
      The Shallows: What the Internet Is Doing to Our Brains by Nicholas G. Carr
      The Death of Expertise: The Campaign Against Established Knowledge and Why It Matters by Thomas M. Nichols
      The Happiness Project by Gretchen Rubin
      The Geography of Bliss: One Grump’s Search for the Happiest Places in the World by Eric Weiner

      • Drewredux

        The Innocent Man by John Grisham literally enraged me.

        Oops: meant under Jeremy

        • Yahmule

          Check out Survivor’s Guide to Prison on Netflix right now. You’ll be a mushroom cloud laying motherfucker.

          • Drewredux

            Will do. I have nurtured a festering grudge regarding ‘justice’ in America.

            At the heart of it is the mentality of prosecutors. They are stat driven and scoff at the notion that they have a duty to get it right. They’ll totally goat fuck a man for breakfast if it is convenient and never blink an eye knowing the real bad guy is still running amok. “It’s the process!”

            The guy in Alva, OK— from the Grisham book— He should be getting cornholed in prison as we speak. He wasn’t just being smug and lazy: it was all about fucking a long term source of jealousy.

            Sorry for my rant. 🤗

          • bradley

            I had two cases that I can think off where I established that my client was almost certainly innocent. So the charges were dropped. But i also established a lot of evidence pointing to someone else (more than the DA had had on my client).
            But the DA didn’t follow up on the two real perps – too embarrassing for them to charge someone, then dismiss the charges, then go after someone else.
            One case was a fairly minor B&E / Theft, so not a big deal. But the other was a sex assault on a 5 year old girl.

          • BlackKnigh

            Them not following up is them not doing their job. Especially where you had saved taxpayers money by handing them evidence they slept on.

      • T. Jensen

        My wife listens to the Gretchen Rubin’s podcast and read the book. I’ve listened to a few episodes, its pretty good. Haven’t read the book yet.

    • Steven_Searls

      A couple of Memoirs:

      You Don’t Have to Say You Love Me – Sherman Alexie
      The Liar’s Club – Mary Karr

    • gobroncos

      Trump’s top 5 non-fiction:
      1) Trump Tweets
      2) Trump: The art of the Deal
      3) Trump: How to think like a Billionaire
      4) Trump: How to Get Rich
      5) Made up stuff

      • bradley

        6) The Joy of Lying

        • Yahmule

          7) Dictator’s Cocks I’ve Sucked

  • bradley

    Cowboys reportedly make Zack Martin highest-paid guard in NFL history with new deal

    https://www.cbssports.com/nfl/news/cowboys-reportedly-make-zack-martin-highest-paid-guard-in-nfl-history-with-new-deal/

  • bradley
  • Carsonic

    I’ll probably watch this Barkley and Chubb story 10-15 minutes at a time over the next week or so. Looks pretty interesting. First thing I noticed was the contrast in eating habits between the two.

    • RyanHennigan

      At work, could you give a quick list of what each one was eating? There is a 40 lb weight difference between them which is a 400 to 600 calorie a day difference to maintain weight and that doesn’t factor in activity level.

      • Carsonic

        Barkley was eating pizza and mac & cheese with soda while Chubb was eating egg white, sausage, and potatoes. I know their bodies are high-powered furnaces that burn pretty much anything, but it seems like Chubb is doing his best to be thoughtful about his diet and get more balanced nutrition.

        • Sparks

          I like Barkley, but if these 2 were ever to meet up on the field, in a running lane, my money is on our guy.

          • BlackKnigh

            Mine too! It would be a heckuva collision though!

        • RyanHennigan

          Thanks Carsonic.

          Seems like Barkley is eating a lot more carbs and he may not be getting the protein he really should be getting. Fats might be close to the same or Chubb is having a bit more. Fats are 9 calories per gram while carbs and proteins are 4. Really hard to tell anything from a single meal because things could be changed by a few scoops of protein powder and then a near carbohydrate-less dinner. Unless you spend all day with someone you really can’t know for sure.

          I’ll eat fried chicken for lunch and salmon for dinner but when I am at lunch people will comment “I thought you were dieting”. I let them know I am but they think I can eat whatever I want and stay lean. They didn’t see breakfast and dinner and don’t realize I am 300 calories blow maintenance a day and therefore I lose weight.

          I agree, it looks suspicious and it seems like Barkley is a bit more careless but only seeing a full day worth of meals and workouts would let us know the truth.

  • bradley
    • RSH

      He needs to get his shoulders and mind right.

    • T. Jensen

      How ironic would it be if he ended up being the starter next year?

      • Andrew

        They still have Sloter too I believe definitely an odd QB connection between the two teams at this point.

        • Nick

          All it takes is for one coach to really like what another team is doing to make that connection happen.

  • Tyler

    Just curious…why do you guys wanna bring up books on a bronco blog? Why do you do it? I just gotta say it blows! There are millions of TV supporters that love what it does for society! Come on man, what the hell did books ever do? Well, unless of course you consider Catcher in the Rye that sat back and allowed s nice young man named John Lennon to be murdered by Mark David Chapman when in fact TV would never do such a thing. Right now the streaming industry is booming, us citizens have never have had easier access to all our favorite shows, TV has set up a golden age of entertainment and all You people want to do is talk books. To boot on a bronco blog website no less. Just so you know I have a been a Bronco fan since 1970, yes 1970! I may not be good at writing paragraphs and that sort of thing, but you know what I love, I love Television, I love and support my xbox, love to volunteer to cook during my LAN parties, love the Broncos dearly and most of all I am believer in Walter White and Jon Snow! Guess what that doesn’t make me a bad person! The point is that, I love following this site, the football takes are great and intrigue me greatly! I am an intelligent Bronco fan, know all the history but can we just keep this blog to football and please keep the books out of it! Please, I would love to continue on this site and love it!

  • Carsonic
  • Carsonic

    Interesting article on what the strength/identity of our offense is shaping up to be.

    With such high success rates on routes with a sharp in-breaking stem
    like the slant and post, it was good to see [DaeSean] Hamilton make plays with the
    ball in his hands. The Penn State receiver broke two-plus tackles on
    30.8 percent of his in-space attempts. Only the after the catch
    dynamo, Carlos Henderson, from the 2017 class and the stunningly
    athletic, Courtland Sutton, of this year posted higher multiple broken
    tackle rates.

    https://www.milehighreport.com/2018/6/12/17378928/broncos-offensive-strategy-2018

    • RyanHennigan

      We haven’t really replaced the slot WR since Welker left. We have tried, but no cigar.

  • Drewredux
    • Yahmule

      My wife’s nephew and his wife are currently preparing four youngsters for athletic scholarships. I’m going to show him this clip at this afternoon’s basketball game to savor the disdain on his face.

    • TiredOfWinning

      Bros before teammates.

  • Yahmule

    Ogre sighting.

    June 12, 2018

  • RSH
    • Yahmule

      They should have tried to trick Goldie into heading there.

      I think this same knucklehead also registered her indignation when this first happened and they got clowned for it.

      June 12, 2018

      • RSH

        Grant’s Twitter Bio:

        Editor @thknwco, entertainment HQ of @denverpost. Proud @UConn husky and @Patriots fan in #BroncosCountry. I like shoes, cocktails and rock-n-roll jam

        • Tyler

          “@Patriots fan in #BroncosCountry” She deserves any and all razzing that comes her way.

          • RSH

            I was thinking the same thing.

      • Hank Mardukis

        Buck up, snowflake.

  • RSH
    • Steven_Searls
    • Yahmule

      Much more common procedure for boxers than football players. I wonder how much the range limitation will affect him. You probably don’t notice how frequently you bend your wrist until you can’t do it anymore.

      South African heavyweight Gerrie Coetzee broke his hand so many times in the 70’s, he had the whole thing permanently fused into a fist. Impressive dedication, but it would seem quite impractical for everyday life.

  • RSH
  • RSH
    • T. Jensen

      I’m still bummed that he wasn’t used more/properly. I really wanted him to destroy the chefs.

      • RSH

        Charles fumble in the Week 8 loss at Kansas City cost him dearly for the remainder of the season.

        • T. Jensen

          yea that was a bad deal though it helped us get Chubb…

      • BlackKnigh

        I had high hopes for him too. He still had a lot in the tank.

  • RSH
  • RSH
  • RSH
  • Nick
    • RyanHennigan

      So odd because Chucky hyped him up during that draft.

  • RSH

    Joe Salazar should probably choose a better photo for the top center of his website than one with a man in a Raiders’ hat if he wants to improve his chances of winning his party’s nomination for Colorado Attorney General. https://salazarforcoag.com/.

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/85d09541fcd86a3db5b4442b4dbb5f0c280fac627a23ef6b5b72beec1777bff6.jpg

  • Nick

    Good thing he kicked foul balls in much more important games.

    https://twitter.com/GrahamGano/status/1006630448213233665

    • Yahmule

      Put the next one in his ear.

  • Yahmule

    Oriole first baseman Chris Davis has struck out 42 times in his last 88 at bats. The O’s still owe him another $92 million from 2019-22.

    June 7, 2018

    • Hank Mardukis

      Ian Desmond is jealous.

  • Yahmule

    Only temporary. The plan is to build concentration camps in Texas while the Glorious Leader Trainee gives speeches demonizing a marginalized group of people.

    June 6, 2018

    • Hank Mardukis

      The party of family values.

      • Yahmule

        If you run afoul of the Kim government, by say, not clapping loudly enough for the Glorious Leader, your entire family might be wiped out or put in work camps. He has had numerous family members executed, the most recent just last year.

        https://cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/180611221556-12-kim-trump-summit-exlarge-169.jpg

        • Drewredux

          Another thing his chuckle headed mninions don’t get is how much long term damage the douchbag is doing to American credibility abroad.

          Merkle is openly declaring the US undependable. The attacks on Trudeau would be snickered on as sophomoric at any typical Middle School burnout gathering. How’d you like to be Estonia right now?

          It’s incomprehensible not that he is a fascist/Putin hybrid, but that the average member of the zombie apocalypse hoot and masturbate all over one another over his disdain for friends, foundational American institutions…pretty much everything.

          My fantasy is that the abomination’s Presidency ends with treason charges. It is the only fitting justice for the biggest existential threat to America since the confederacy.

        • TiredOfWinning

          Hard to say who has bigger hands by the photo. Does a tension, and a hence fissure, develop?

          • Yahmule

            They already clowned him about his microdigits a couple weeks ago.

            June 1, 2018

  • Nick
  • Yahmule

    21 X All Star in the ESPN booth telling baseball stories during the Braves/Mets right now. So good.

    Tim Kurkjian: “Hank, you batted .362 with seven homers against Sandy Koufax! How?”

    Hank Aaron: “Lucky!”

    June 12, 2018

    • Yahmule

      Technically, Hank was a 25 X All Star. MLB inexplicably played two ASG each season from 59-62.

      • Yahmule

        They also talked to Willie Mays. Now, Billy Williams is on the phone and he’s killing it.

      • TiredOfWinning

        What? At one-third and the two-thirds mark?

        • Yahmule

          No, both games over the summer, usually about three weeks apart.

          • TiredOfWinning

            What’s the point, then? Just to play two games? No, need to answer. I can do my own research to find out why. If anything, I’m glad to see MLB has a history of experimenting and than retracting.