• The Color Orange

    Klis tells rookies he’s the only member of the media then can trust:

    Even reporter Mike Klis got in there and talked with rookies about interacting with the media. He used his time with them wisely, paving the way for his use of unnamed anonymous sources while casting the character of his colleagues into doubt. Whoa! Unnamed anonymous sources? Don’t tell a certain regional radio personality about that.

    “Your name won’t be used, but what you say may be,’’ I told the Broncos rookies. “You can trust me with ‘off record’ but nobody else.’’
    https://www.milehighreport.com/2018/5/14/17351346/horse-tracks-denver-broncos-rookie-minicamp-in-the-books

    • Nick

      Translation: “Don’t confirm to Nicki”?

    • bradley

      “You can trust me with ‘off record’ but nobody else.’’

      Maybe Klis said it tongue in cheek?

    • Yahmule

      I like how he makes his own trouble. I’m not sure if he’s not that bright or just completely burnt out and going through the motions.

      • The Color Orange

        I think a little bit of both.

  • bradley

    Chuck Knox Passes Away at 86

    https://www.footballoutsiders.com/index.php?q=extra-points/2018/chcuk-knox-passes-away-86

    Longtime NFL head coach Chuck Knox, aka “Ground Chuck” for his love of the running game, passed away today at the age of 86. Knox coached the Rams from 1973-1977 as well as 1992-1994, the Bills from 1978-1982, and the Seahawks from 1983-1991. He was NFL Coach of the Year in 1973, 1980, and 1984, once with each franchise.

  • bradley

    Regrading the 2015 NFL Draft: Rams prove wise with Gurley, 10 teams see grade fall to D or F

    https://www.cbssports.com/nfl/news/regrading-the-2015-nfl-draft-rams-prove-wise-with-gurley-10-teams-see-grade-fall-to-d-or-f/

    Denver Broncos
    2015 grade: B

    The skinny: They had nine picks in the draft and three are still on the roster. First-round pick Shane Ray has been a solid player for the Broncos, but has just 13 sacks in three seasons and is coming off an injury-shortened season where he started seven games. Second-round offensive tackle Ty Sambrailo was traded to Atlanta last year. That’s a major miss. Third-round guard Max Garcia has started 37 games the past three seasons, so there is some value there, even if he is just average. Tight end Jeff Heuerman, their other third-round pick, is projected as their starter this season, but he has just 18 catches in three seasons and tore his ACL as a rookie. This class did not bring much for the Broncos. Trevor Siemian did come in the seventh and he started at quarterback last season, but is now in Minnesota.

    How I did: I liked the pick of Sambrailo, so that’s a whiff just like for the Broncos. I questioned taking Ray that high and that’s still to be determined. My third-day gem was Garcia, who has started the most games of anybody in their class.

    New grade: D

    • Drewredux

      Maybe there is a multiverse, and he is talking about some other Max Garcia. Mediocre people should be appalled by the comparison.

    • The Color Orange

      He needs a proofreader. Garcia was a fourth round pick, which he seems to have known at one point because he was his “third-day gem.”

    • Russ

      If I recall, Ray fell on draft day because he got caught in possession of marijuana the week of the draft. Which is incredibly stupid. But talent-wise, he was generally regarded as a top-10 or -15 pick, and the Broncos drafted him at 23. Granted, they traded up to do so, but Ray was still good value at 23 at the time and may well be a very good player some day, but probably not for the Broncos. I’d say it’s a stretch to call Garcia average, and Heuerman is a straight bust and potential training camp cut. “D” sounds about right to me.

    • FloydLittle44

      Three years ago the Broncos were touting Heuerman as something special. Two years ago it’s Butt and now Fumigalli. I hope one of them succeeds however none were very special in college. I’m sure they have plan B on speed dial.

  • Nick
  • bradley

    PFF 2018 NFL Draft Recap – Denver Broncos

    https://www.profootballfocus.com/news/pro-draft-recap-2018-broncos

    • gobroncos

      I wish they had commented more on fumagalli’s blocking. He seems ok, but can whiff once in a while.

  • Nick

    So the Vegas Golden Knights are in the conference finals. It is my wish to see them do as well as possible over the next two years and beyond, so that the Raiders don’t even become the most popular sports team in their own new town.

  • Nick
    • Nick

      Ginsburg and Sotomayor dissented in full, Breyer concurred in part and dissented in part.

      • Tim

        Have you read the opinions?

        • Nick

          Just skimmed them, as I have other things to do. Seems like the dissents were most upset about not severing parts of PASPA from the unconstitutional axe. Breyer’s opinion described it as severing the ban on individuals on gambling on sports from the ban on state governments authorizing it.

          I’m sure the actual lawyers can explain that better than me, though.

          • Tim

            That’s interesting, I would love to hear a lawyer’s take on this issue. It seems the dissenting opinion was more upset that they were just completely cutting it down instead of just cutting out the bad parts. Of course the opinion that this will most negatively affect young people seems to me a bit outdated as I feel gambling issues goes through all ages, just like every vice.

          • Nick

            Strongly agree with your last sentence.

          • Alaskan

            There is little doubt that Congress could pass a law saying there will be no sports betting in the United States. The problem, it seems, is allowing some states to have it while saying no additional states may.
            https://www.si.com/more-sports/2018/05/14/sports-betting-legal-supreme-court-ruling-analysis

          • Nick

            That always seemed like a huge problem to me on a non-legal basis as well. It’s one thing to say no one can do it, but another to say only certain states can do it, even if their citizens say otherwise through the democratic process.

          • DCJ1

            My bigger problem is that prohibition of so-called vices always leads to organized crime taking over the supply. Simply put, people will gamble/ingest/fornicate legally or illegally no matter how many laws Congress passes. The infamous Black Sox scandal took place during a period of very strict prohibition of sports betting, drinking actually went up during prohibition, and Congressmen have been caught violating prostitution laws they voted for.

            A moderate approach of allowing but regulating combined with recognition and treatment of addiction is a far more humane and sustainable approach. Acknowledge people are going to do it, write laws that help them do it safely, and then impose a moderate tax rate to help enforce those laws. Make the permissive atmosphere of Nevada the norm, not the exception (but leave off the neon).

          • FarAwayBroncoFan

            Agree. One issue though is they really need to regulate it well, and that’s hard.

            Singapore, for example, has legalized prostitution. They claim it’s well-regulated. And while it is heavily regulated, I know for a fact a significant percentage of the women in that trade there are trafficked. So while the government focuses on health and taxation, they basically ignore how these workers get there, and their inability to leave.

          • PiperAR

            That just makes too much sense.

          • Alaskan

            Evidently the NFL intends to ask Congress to establish a uniform betting system for all states.
            http://www.latimes.com/sports/nfl/la-sp-sports-betting-football-20180514-story.html

    • Yahmule

      Going to have to see how this affects high stakes fantasy sports, but I’m tentatively optimistic since some states insist on calling it gambling. A lot of my friends might be cheering this decision.

      • Rileyrott

        Yep. My state (Arizona) does not allow any form of online fantasy sports participation. Really curious to see where this goes here.

        • Yahmule

          It would have been devastating to me to see it banned in Colorado. This ruling removes the possibility of that happening.

  • bradley

    PFF 2018 NFL Draft Recap – Oakland Raiders

    https://www.profootballfocus.com/news/pro-draft-recap-2018-raiders

    • G Mik

      Interesting. I thought it read fairly optimistically. Time will tell…

  • WhoShotBobbyHumphrey
    • Nick

      Beat you to it by half an hour. : )

      • WhoShotBobbyHumphrey

        Ha! I thought it was a political post, and skimmed right by it! Where can I put my money on the the over for Lamar Jackson .5 starts ?!

        • Nick

          This is a good opportunity to issue a reminder that, as much as some may not like it, sports can’t be separated from politics.

          • WhoShotBobbyHumphrey

            I think people that get upset about other people talking about politics, is just as bad as people getting upset with people who do not share their political views. I wouldn’t think it would be as fun to come to a football site, if politics was the center focus, but I think this website does a great job of only integrating when necessary.

    • Drewredux

      I’m torn on the vice shit (legalized weed/ gambling/etc).

      Too most of the population, these things are harmless. But to the segments they aren’t, addiction is like Ebola.

      I’m not sure government should effectively sponsor such behavior.

      • Nick

        Strongly agree with your last sentence. I feel real dirty about governments getting directly involved in that kind of thing.

        • Drewredux

          They talk a lot about gateway drugs.

          I don’t think it so much about the drug, as it is crossing the line of the law.

          • bradley

            If you know someone that can get you pot, you know someone that can get you meth. Or the pot dealer you know knows someone.

          • TiredOfWinning

            What? This isn’t at all true.

          • T. Jensen

            More true than you’d think, you just know the wrong dealers.

            Speaking on behalf of my meth addicted ex brother in law.

          • TiredOfWinning

            Well, my point is that it’s anecdotal evidence in any case, and nothing we should be basing public policy on.

          • bradley

            If you could round it all up, you’d have millions and millions of anecdotes backing up what I said.
            That’s plenty to base public opinion on.
            And really, isn’t the opposite view based on anecdotal evidence? And probably just a few hundred anecdotes.

          • TiredOfWinning

            Anecdotal evidence should never be the basis of public policy. It’s laughable that there’s millions of people who can get meth from their pot dealers somehow. If you want to show a real peer-reviewed study that suggests marijuana is a gateway drug, sure, I’ll take a look. But beyond that your hunches based on your own experience are just that; you don’t know whether your experience is unique to you and those who are culturally similar to you, or if it representative of a larger trend. In general, I think it’s sloppy thinking to believe that one kind of vice or crime necessarily makes it easier to engage in an another more severe vice or crime.

          • bradley

            The term “gateway drug” is the problem. Cops and DAs use it to mean that someone who gets some pot from a dealer is probably going to end up addicted to one or more hard drugs. This is bull shit.
            But anyone who has been able to score pot on the street is much closer to being able to score hard drugs than someone who has no experience with buying something illegally.

      • WhoShotBobbyHumphrey

        Where there is a money opportunity, the Government is closely on its heels. IMHO, I think cigarettes should have been one the first things to be made illegal, but who wants to step in front of that cash train?!

        • T. Jensen

          When you can tax it?

          • WhoShotBobbyHumphrey

            Exactly. Population control, and revenue. Too sweet to pass up.

        • Sparks

          Make cigarettes illegal because of the damage it causes to the user?

          • bradley

            When you outlaw tobacco, outlaws will still have tobacco.

          • T. Jensen

            same with weed, alcohol, drugs, guns, abortions, etc.

            A prohibition almost never works properly. Especially for things that are easily obtained/created like all the above.

          • bradley

            I’ll tell you, for an old guy who’s been smoking pot for almost fifty years, dealing with dealers and sneaking around, it is very strange to walk into a nice new pot store and browse around and make a selection and walk out in broad daylight.

          • WhoShotBobbyHumphrey

            No more having to listen to some idiots lame ass stories for 30 min just to buy an 1/8th is liberating.

          • Yahmule

            I had to watch an entire episode of Who’s the Boss with my guy one time. It gave a me a form of PTSD.

          • Yahmule

            Driving around Pacoima or Van Nuys, pantomiming hitting a J while cruising by groups of loitering Mexican teenagers in the hopes of buying ten bucks worth of minty smelling super compressed weed. Those were the days.

          • Drewredux

            I am 100% for medical marijuana. Those tax dollars are huge and can go to schools, etc. There also remains an acknowledgment that the drug is potentially dangerous.

            On the recreational, why not now? I haven’t seen anything but Colorado dispensary weed on the street in Enid for a couple years now. It’s as easy to get as a half pint of rotgut vodka 95% of the time.

            I’m just not sure it was the right thing to do in the first place.

          • T. Jensen

            define right.

            As a Mormon my initial response is prohibit all of it (I don’t partake in any of those vices, Mtn Dew is the hardest drug I use).

            But is it really worth the effort to police/regulate? The prohibition of Alcohol (which kills people every day) was probably the right thing to do. Unfortunately it caused so many issues it was repealed. It is now fairly well regulated and controlled (not to mention taxed).

            I think it is far easier for teenagers to get weed today then it is to get alcohol/tobacco.

            I’m all for legalizing and regulating it. Especially if it can open up some of the medical and non-drug uses of the plant.

            Of course its an interesting issue because I would hate for it to go the way of cigarettes and get a bunch of chemicals and crap added to it by the big companies… Its also a pretty easy to grow plant so I wonder if there will remain an underground marketplace for it, especially if big companies make it less “pure”.

          • Drewredux

            Responsible and ethical would be my definition of right.

          • WhoShotBobbyHumphrey

            Let me clarify. My heart/gut thinks that if you want to make things like weed/gambling/etc illegal, like Drew was pointing out, then cigarettes should top that list, given all the diseases, health issues it causes. Obviously, it would be virtually impossible to go backwards now, or even waste money policing it, nor would the government want to lose its tax money.

      • Prater2Beadles4Six

        I think legalizing weed should be a relative no brainer. I think the benefits of legalization outweigh the harm, and the fact that there is a huge racial disparity in the way marijuana crimes are charged really puts it over the edge. I think the benefits of legalizing prostitution would well outweigh the negatives too. Things like gambling and harder drugs get a bit trickier.

        • Drewredux

          Politically, I’m with you.

          It would be interesting to see what the consequences are a couple generations from now.

          Moving what lines how gets tricky.

        • FarAwayBroncoFan

          I would include prostitution in the trickier grouping, because with substances, gambling etc., you’re only harming yourself (potentially). With prostitution, the products are human beings. And while we like to think folks do this of their own accord, that’s often not the case. They’re regularly exploited, even in regulated environments. It’s hard to regulate how people treat each other.

          • cjfarls

            Yep – I guess the argument is, its easier to regulate the working conditions in a legalized business than it is in a business where the whole thing is black-market.
            But agree – the big danger in prostitution is to the potentially exploited producers rather than the consumers… its kinda the opposite of the other ones.

          • Prater2Beadles4Six

            Fair points. Proper regulation is certainly a requirement and that is often easier said than done.

          • G Mik

            The argument here is that in places like Parump NV and Amsterdam you don’t see the levels of human trafficking you’ll find in areas where it’s illegal. I think most of us agree that women should be able to make a choice with what they want to do with their lives and I for one hope my daughter makes good choices.

          • FarAwayBroncoFan

            I can’t speak to Nevada, but Amsterdam has a trafficking problem. That they’re so “enlightened” means that they likely at least try and address it…better than many places. Here is the 1st paragraph of the USG’s Trafficking in Person Report on the Netherlands:

            NETHERLANDS: TIER 1
            The Netherlands is a source, destination, and transit country for men, women, and children from the Netherlands, Eastern Europe, Africa, and South and East Asia subjected to sex trafficking and forced labor, such as inland shipping, offshore oil exploration, agriculture, horticulture, catering, food processing, domestic servitude, and forced criminal activity. Vulnerable populations include Dutch girls enticed by young male traffickers (“loverboys,” who establish sham love relationships with vulnerable girls before intimidating them into sexual exploitation), unaccompanied children seeking asylum, women dependent on residency status obtained through fraudulent or forced marriages, domestic workers of foreign diplomats, Roma, and vulnerable women and men recruited in Eastern Europe, Africa, and Asia. There were reports of Dutch citizens engaging in child sex tourism abroad. In January 2016, media reported police and social workers found concrete signs of human traffickers recruiting in asylum centers, allegedly targeting women for prostitution and men for forced labor.

            We (meaning the USG) rate Netherlands as tier 1, which means the issue is not so bad (Tier 3 is the worst). We rate ourselves Tier 1 (Yeah, how very nice, especially considering that the agency that looks at trafficking issues abroad is not the same agency that looks at trafficking here domestically….but I digress).

            I guess my basic thought on this, is that regulation is probably better than nothing, but even with the most enlightened regulation (yeah, sure), there will always be bad actors that will seek out vulnerabilities within what ever system exists to exploit others. I personally don’t think women involved in the trade should be punished at all, but anyone making money off of exploiting women ought to face major jail time – at least twenty years. Probably wouldn’t effectively deter it, but it would be a start,

          • G Mik

            I think we’re pretty much in agreement here but anything that helps I’ll consider a step in teh right direction though not a full solution. For ex look at the Opioid Epidemic here. Thanks for regulating, Doc.

          • DragonPie

            We don’t help people. We only criminalize sex workers. If it is illegal, it shouldn’t be for sex workers, but instead for the johns. Otherwise, we exacerbate the problem. Similar to what happens to addicts from our current drug laws.

  • Nick

    There’s a lot of good comments below that’s related to the SCOTUS decision today, and unfortunately I won’t have the time to reply to all of them individually.

    I do want to issue one word of caution about regulation: it needs to be limited to correcting legitimate and unavoidable market failures. If you overregulate, black markets can still arise from such overregulation. Also, bad regulations can often create oligarchical regimes that favor entrenched businesses. Occupational licensing is plagued with that. The NFL may be trying to do something similar here by pushing governments to insert a clause called directing a cut of revenue to the NFL an “integrity tax”.

    And speaking of taxes, as I alluded to Drew below I strongly oppose the government creating cash cows for itself from industries society has coded as “vices”.

    • cjfarls

      Yep – regulations need targeted at societal harms/market failures, not just at things we don’t like.
      E.g., exploitation of prostitutes is the “harm”… as we discuss below, that should be target of regs, not the providers, etc.

      For drugs, its the opposite – we need to regulate the harms of the product, not the general non-harmful use. So things like cigarettes, etc. that create a lot of societal costs probably need more heavily regulated than things taken at home that don’t have the broader societal health impacts. A.k.a. drunk driving is a big societal harm and needs heavily regulated… moderately drinking a homebrew at home probably doesn’t any regulation at all.

  • royalwithcheese
  • Nick

    I’m sure there will be plenty of sports jokes along the lines of “Just the perfect size for a Raiders/Patriots game!”

    https://twitter.com/TheSunTech/status/995978317227491328

    • bradley

      Sheeeit. That would totally mess with us and our little blue planet if it hit.

      • VonSwenson

        That’s roughly Tunguska-sized.

    • Sparks

      They’ve been tracking it for 8 years. Shouldn’t Bruce Willis and company have neutralized it by now?

      • Steven_Searls

        Bruce had a scheduling conflict. And the Avengers were tied up with something big I hear.

      • SterlingMalloryArcher

        Also Michael Clarke Duncan passed away and Affleck is far too sad to deal with this shit right now.

        • Sparks

          If anyone has ever seen a Die Hard movie, they would know that Bruce Willis could get it done with a small group of us In-Thinarians, let alone MCD or Affleck.

    • gobroncos

      In reading the articles, they left off a “one” at the beginning of the 26,000 miles. It will be 126,000 miles away, not 26,000 miles, which is just OVER half the distance from the moon, not less than half the distance. The moon is 239,000 miles away from earth.

    • Yahmule

      Apophis 2036. Get your affairs in order, folks.

    • BlackKnigh

      Was this asteroid the one that that spacecraft smashed into trying to knock it off course?

  • Nick
  • InSiemianWeTrust

    WHO IS FUCKING PUMPED FOR SWAG KELLY?!

    In all seriousness, hope Keenum excels. If not, hope one of our backup QBs can rise to the occasion.

    • T. Jensen

      If Kelly starts at some point will your name change?

      • InSiemianWeTrust

        Nevaaaaaaar

        • The 5th Amigo

          InSwagWeTrust has a nice ring to it

    • SterlingMalloryArcher

      The obsession with the late round pick is growing strong. I already have at least one neighbor saying Kelly’s the “real deal.”

      • Steven_Searls

        I figure Kelly has this one year to show something or he’s gone. Pax on the other hand is still being given a chance because 1st round. Makes you realize where you go in draft often decides your pro football fate, and stories like Kurt Warner or Romo or Brady are exceptionally rare.

        • Jeremy

          Tom Brandstander got a try with 5 teams over 4 years and Zac Dysert spent last year as a backup in Dallas, his 7th stop in 5 years (and I still hear talk that he might not be done yet), so I’m not sure that’s always the case.

          • G Mik

            Maybe not always but it DEFINITELY matters.

          • Yahmule

            Huge difference between being a camp arm and getting a shot.

          • Yahmule

            Dan Reeves brought bring in a guy named Mike Perez like three summers in a row. He was born in Denver and still lives here and he really thought he had a shot each time.

          • DragonPie

            Well, Reeves always did want to replace Elway.

          • Yahmule

            John was happy to see Perez each summer, because it meant fewer passes he would have to throw. Mike just never had even a 1% chance of making the roster, though.

      • Andrew

        I root for the dude like I would any Bronco but this fanbase and late round QB’s it pretty damn funny whether it’s Brandstater, Dysert, Siemian, Kelly etc… there always seems to be a cult following. I’ll stay on the Keemun train until proven otherwise!

        • Tim

          Most popular position is the unproven backup QB. He represents hope without having shown any flaws

        • Drewredux

          I’m always a sucker for long-shots and redemption stories.

          Kelly getting his shit together and then being rewarded for it would be a pretty fun ride.

          • T. Jensen

            then earning the ring his uncle never could…

          • BlackKnigh

            In 2018, 2019, and 2020. I am not greedy. Just fantasizing.

          • Nick

            Keep his first ring, then go the Shannon Sharpe route and give the 2nd to his uncle. I’ll open the floor as to whom should get #3.

          • BlackKnigh

            That is a great idea! Jim Kelly deserves a ring.

        • Yahmule

          Case Keenum was a UDFA.

        • DragonPie

          You forgot our man Van Pelt!

          • Sparks

            Van Pelt NEVER got a fair shake!

          • bradley

            CSU guys never do. Just look at Shaq Barrett. Oh wait.

          • OnionKnight

            Dude was a fullback playing QB.

        • VonSwenson

          Jeff Lewis! Same number of letters as Elway!

      • RSH

        The difference between Kelly and many late round wonders, is that he has the actual ability to play quarterback in the NFL unlike the Tom Brandstaters, Zac Dyserts, and Adam Webers of the world. His college tape and performances in the SEC are indicative of that.

        • Sparks

          Beat me to it. Remove the off the field stuff and the injuries and he’d have been a fringe guy to the top 4 drafted this year. Certainly before Rudolph, IMO.

        • SterlingMalloryArcher

          That’s true, and there are definitely success stories from some late round picks/undrafted players. But the fact remains 31 teams felt he was undraftable, so it’s still a bit of a long shot that he pans out.

  • T. Jensen

    Thought this was an interesting off topic article. https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2018/05/jails-are-replacing-in-person-visits-with-video-calling-services-theyre-awful/

    It’s amazing how much people profit over prisoners…

    • Kush-Lash

      Did my undergrad senior thesis on the private prison industry. There is something is inherently wrong (a breach of our social contract?) with a system that values profit from incarceration. The system works flawlessly when unregulated and boosted by a lobby on par with tobacco and guns. It’s also worth noting this isn’t a partisan topic. Governors, assemblys and senates all over the country have got in bed with the system.

      • DragonPie

        That and they don’t save money, and call for quotas on prisoner numbers or states face harsh penalties (Which sounds unconstitutional to me). The theoretical idea is that market forces will somehow magically save money compared to government run facilities, but their incentives are to squeeze every last dime out of the incarceration and to have high incarceration rates and the contracts they sign reflect that.

        The only theoretical place that they can genuinely save money are those that decrease their security or if they aren’t beholden to uphold civil rights.

        And now we have the highest prison population on the planet and the highest per capita rate of incarceration.

        And how many average ‘Mericans know any of this?

        • Kush-Lash

          Yep, economic incentives were the first hypothesis I tested. No correlation what so ever, in fact the only ‘tell’ as to whether or not States consider privatization was regional. Even then, it’s a misnomer because the south already has a high prison population. Best part, judges in PA taking kickbacks for incarcerating juvenile offenders at a private ran facility in lieu of rehabilitation or work release.

          • DragonPie

            I remember reading about a Pennsylvania judge that got an appallingly short sentence for doing so.

  • Nick

    This means that the Broncos passed on Garcia on the waiver wire.

    https://twitter.com/RapSheet/status/996140088563322888

  • royalwithcheese
    • Tyler

      That didn’t take long

    • G Mik

      He must have issues. Hopefully the guy gets them corrected and finds his potential.

      • Prater2Beadles4Six

        Troy Renck was saying on the drive that his heart wasn’t in playing and he was wanting to pursue coaching.

      • T. Jensen

        I don’t think that’s a safe assumption. Football is a dangerous sport. He could easily just be thinking he got his degree and can find other employment without risking his body. I have quite a few friends that have messed up knees and backs from high school football. I cannot imagine how much more a person would suffer playing years in the NFL…

        Now if he does have issues and actually wants to play, I do hope he confronts his demons and reaches his potential.

        • G Mik

          I was proven wrong yesterday. He doesn’t have the passion to play the game (but wants to possibly coach?). Bad assumption on my part and glad I was wrong.

    • bradley

      I had high hopes for him.

    • FarAwayBroncoFan

      One summer in college, Eric Bienemy and his pals sat down just next to me at the pool of the apt. I was living in then.

      I overheard part of their conversation, which was fascinating. Basically, Bienemy was telling his friends that football success wasn’t about talent or potential, but all about work. He used George Hemmingway as an example, mentioning what a talented, super productive H.S. guy he was, yet now that he’d made it in College, he was just kind of coasting.

      Given Bienemy’s size, I can understand his viewpoint. But it does make me think we may be pleasantly surprised by Lindsey.

      Not saying that’s Lotulelei’s issue, but it’s the first thing I think of.

    • Nick

      And now we have an answer as to why.

      https://twitter.com/RyanKoenigsberg/status/996157922185854976

      $15,000 is nowhere near enough to argue over for a multi-million dollar enterprise like the Broncos, but had they instead placed him on reserve/retired they could have demanded that he pay that money back.

      • Yahmule

        Maybe he just doesn’t like football that much. Could be he was a big strong kid from a football family and playing was more or less expected of him from everybody.

      • G Mik

        Good for him. Couldn’t have been an easy decision.

      • BlackKnigh

        I thought he might be able to contribute – if not this year – next. I wish him well. As G Mik says – “Couldn’t have been an easy decision”.