It’s All Orange, Fat Man: 03/29/16

News

– The Texans will bring back RFA CB A.J Bouye.

– Just in case you were wondering, the 40 yard dash have no impact on the draft stock for T’s.

– With his new paycheck earnings from the Dolphins, DT Ndamukong Suh has bought several real estate properties as an aspiring real-estate mogul.

– The Dolphins, suddenly desperate at RB, bring in RB Arian Foster for a visit. Just don’t be surprised if they don’t sign him though.

– Consenus first overall pick T Laremy Tunsil will not be running the 40 anytime soon, like it matters, because of a hamstring injury.

– Roger Goodell’s initial comments regarding the ejection rule was more of an ‘answering the question’ than it was a ‘serious suggestion’.

– The Packers are looking for RB’s and they are interested in former Denver RB Ronnie Hillman.

– As mentioned earlier yesterday: The Packers have signed TE Jared Cook (who by the way, they also tried to trade for earlier), the Saints have signed DT Nick Fairley, and the Panthers have signed CB Brandon Boykin.

– Prospect DE Robert Nkemdiche answered some questions about his character issues during Ole Miss’ pro day.

– Art Briles, RGIII’s former coach, told a reporter that he is desperate to make his next situation work with the Browns. 

Analysis

– John Clayton goes over the best remaining free agents in the NFL.

– Bill Barnwell analyzes the contract situation in Indy between Andrew Luck and the Indianapolis Colts.

– Matt Bowen argues that top draft prospects should always aces their pro days. And that is because the grind the NFL combine has does not compare to the grind of a pro day.

– Sheil Kapadia explains why the relationship between Seahawks GM John Schneider and HC Pete Carroll works.

– PFF Analysts debate whether RB Ezekiel Elliot is a Top 10 draft pick.

– Mike Renner predicts where the Top 8 remaining free agents will go.

– A guest of Chase Stuart’s website posts YPC leaders at 180/200/220 carries during the NFL season.

Broncos

– Troy Renck mentions that QB Colin Kaepernick’s recent surgeries have a lot to do with why the Broncos are being cautious about trying to obtain the QB.

– Jeff Legwold reminds the fanbase that the Broncos have won the title and now they have to deal with the hangover that comes with it.

– As mentioned in the comments by someone yesterday, the Broncos will bring in two prospects on pre-draft visits.

Shakin’ Noggin’ Syndrome Shenanigans

– LB Deandre Levy took a shot at Jim Irsay’s comments regarding CTE via Instagram post. Jim Irsay commented that head injuries in football are similar to taking aspirin.

– According to David Chao, the NFL should let the CTE issue go and admit that it is connected to football.

– More owners of the NFL also dispute Jeff Miller’s claims that CTE and football are tied together.

– On a separate note, I do not agree with the opinions of some owners that believe CTE is not linked to the sport of football. This being said, no one should be surprised these are their viewpoints. They are old guys who bought/inherited football teams when guys like Steve Atwater, Jack Lambert, Chuck Noll, and Derrick Thomas were delivering blows to the head more than they were tackling guys and it was considered okay, if not awesome. Of course they aren’t going to have “progressive” viewpoints on these issues. They were born in a different time.

– I will also add that the most recent president of the AFCA, Tommy Tuberville, also a former head coach for the University of Cincinnati, gave a speech at the American Football Coaches Association Convention in Texas last January. I attended his speech more or less because it was a precursor to Steve Spurrier’s speech that occurred directly after his and if you know Steve Spurrier from his time on ESPN, he is very entertaining to listen to. Anyway, Coach Tuberville spoke for the first five minutes about how great it is to be a coach and what great work we are all doing which was basically, typical crowd-pandering stuff that people would notice more if he didn’t mention it at all. I get it. After that though, he said something that caught my attention: He began to passionately argue that the media is trying to blow up injuries, specifically ones that happen to the head, because they want to destroy the game of football and then he reiterated that the injuries that happen in football are no different than any other sport. He then brought a guy up who was he founder for a support program for athletes with permanent disabilities (can’t remember what it was) and he started off his speech very awkwardly by telling us that he is not in support of the media’s agenda to ruin football.

Take with that what you will, I don’t support those ideas either. Safety is one of the requirements when coaching athletes and it would be hard for me to not take head related injuries into consideration for my player’s well-being. Just be let it known that coaches, especially older ones, are really having a hard time accepting that head related injuries and football are directly connected.

If it makes you feel any better though, athletic trainers are first and foremost responsible for whether athletes get to take the field or not at the high school level all the way up to the pro level. If the trainer says the player cannot play, he cannot play. Coaches that try to circumvent the issue by bullying or coercing such trainers are liable for gross negligence. The athletic trainers are the first and last call on player health.

Preach!

“Life is really simple but we insist on making it complicated – Confucius

Published by

Dubs

I am a film coordinator for a FCS school. I am glad to be around the game of football and had the chance to learn from a lot of great people. I wouldn't be where I am without the gracious support of my family, coaches, assistants, and players. I also greatly appreciate you guys who take the time to read my stuff and show genuine appreciation. It means a ton! You guys are awesome! Twitter Handle: @FBDubs

  • InSiemianWeTrust

    There’s a DSM definition of these behaviors. “When the individual deals with emotional conflict or internal or external stressors by concealing the true motivations for his or her own thoughts, actions, or feelings through the elaboration of reassuring or self serving but incorrect explanations.

    • SterlingMalloryArcher

      Just saw this. Basically the same thing I was trying to say, but worded much more eloquently.

    • Yahmule

      Human beings are masters of compartmentalization. It’s nearly impossible to function in society without learning that skill.

  • ohiobronco

    Thank you Dubs for the extended commentary this morning. I get that owners and coaches feel like their livelihoods are threatened but they surely must realize how transparent they sound by denying evidence which goes against their self interest. The media conspiracy thing is particularly silly. ESPN wants to destroy their biggest cash cow? In general claiming a media agenda when they report something you don’t want to hear is a good way to sound stupid.

    • SterlingMalloryArcher

      I think they also are affected by their own consciences. They don’t believe that football causes lifelong debilitating brain disease because if it did they would probably feel pretty awful about it. So it’s a defense mechanism.

      It’s like a creationist dismissing evolutionary science. The science is sound, but they don’t want to believe that because it rocks their whole world view.

      • MarsLineman

        I can’t get into details about yet-unpublished research. But the more evidence I discover about CTE, the more convinced I become that the NFL will eventually have to become glorified flag football to survive.

        The below wikipedia link shows where my research is connected to CTE (very indirectly for now, but that may change eventually)-

        “A small group of individuals with CTE have chronic traumatic encephalomyopathy (CTEM), characterized by motor neuron disease symptoms and mimics Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). Progressive muscle weakness and balance and gait problems seem to be early signs of CTEM.[6]”

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chronic_traumatic_encephalopathy

      • Hercules_Rockefeller

        I think it’s hard to overstate the affect that denial can have in a situation like this. Owning a football team is most of these guy’s life’s work. For some of these guys the word “work” doesn’t really apply, but my point is that being an NFL owner is probably a pretty big part of their self image. Everyone believes that the work they do is valuable and has a positive impact; that’s human nature whether you’re digging ditches, sitting in a cubicle, or one of the one percent. Even crooks like Bernie Madoff manage to convince themselves that they were really looking out for their investors’ interest in the long run; it’s not a stretch to imagine that an NFL owner would cling to whatever evidence there may be that CTE isn’t related to football even in the face of overwhelming evidence that it is.

        • MarsLineman

          I’m sympathetic to long-time NFL owners- it must be hard to accept this new information about CTE in a league that you’ve dedicated your lifetime to building. The Rooneys and Maras of the world (and Bowlen) get a pass in my opinion.

          But I have no such sympathy for new NFL owners.

          • Yahmule

            Yeah, the Rooneys were the only people in Pennsylvania who didn’t know Mike Webster was sleeping on the bus station floor.

        • Yahmule

          Or they could be clinical psychopaths. They make up 1% of the population, but that figure is wildly inflated when you start diagnosing CEO’s.

        • Great point! Even Al Capone went to his deathbed thinking he made the place better than when he got there.

          • Yahmule

            So, it’s only that these guys have titanic egos that don’t allow them to accept blame. Much more sympathetic characters in that light.

      • Yahmule

        Given the unbelievably callous attitudes toward labor in this country historically, I think they simply don’t give a shit. If they did, they wouldn’t have deliberately suppressed information about concussions and resisted all efforts to help these retired players.

    • Jeremy

      I don’t think he means that it is a conspiracy in that ESPN executives gathered in a room and discussed ways to destroy football. I think it’s more that stories about this are a very hot topic and therefore popular, and the more extremist position they take the more clicks they will generate and the more profitable they will be in the short run.

      Not saying I agree or disagree, just trying to clarify what I think he is getting at.

      • ohiobronco

        Dubs’ paraphrase was “they want to destroy the game of football”. That’s going a lot further than sensitization for ratings.

  • Nick

    I’m glad I wasn’t the only one irked by Tommy Tuberville’s nonsensical anti-media comments there.

    • Cam Newton

      What did Tubs say? I must have missed it…

    • Steven_Searls

      Now, now, I’m sure he suffers from Tourette’s syndrome, something I’ve noticed is common to many coaches.

  • T. Jensen

    THis is linking to the suh article – More owners of the NFL also dispute Jeff Miller’s claims that CTE and football are tied together.

    • Thanks, will fix at 4:30pm

  • Nick

    I expected that Cam Jordan would get his contract restructured, but restructuring the punter is rarely a wise idea.

    https://twitter.com/nick_underhill/status/714744146402086913

  • RSH, Esq.

    Interestingly, the Broncos are just behind Washington and the New York Jets for most quarterbacks selected in the NFL Draft between 1999 and 2015.

    https://twitter.com/CorkGaines/status/713077041495547905

    • ohiobronco

      Aside from Cutler, Tebow and Osweiler they were all late rounders. Hardly a franchise habitually reaching for QBs.

      • RSH, Esq.

        Definitely. I was just surprised that the Broncos had selected as many quarterbacks as they have in comparison to other franchises. Many of those selections, however, were in later rounds such as Zac Dysert and Trevor Siemian.

        • ohiobronco

          The Van Pelt/Bradstater/Dysert/Siemian archetype is certainly a staple of Broncos talk.

          • Lonestar47

            All of which went on to great careers working at Verizon in malls across america.

            Wait tthat welS RBs.

      • Lonestar47

        Maybe greasy. Forget where tanahan took him.

        • ohiobronco

          3rd round in ’98 (so outside the range of this particular stat). He turned into a journeyman which is pretty much the baseline for a 3rd round QB.

          • Lonestar47

            Thanks forgot.

            But IMO late round to me is 4th thru 12th. Anyone remember those days b

          • VonSwenson

            I once saw an article on the 100 greatest NFL quarterbacks of all time (since deleted from internet) that had Brian Griese rated in the 90s. That’s probably about right, and puts him into the Broncos top 5. Any of you remember the years before Elway?

          • Steven_Searls

            Sadly yes. Charlie Johnson was the best we had. I’d rate him over Craig Morton who benefited from the Orange Crush defense.

            http://broncoplanet.com/forum/bronco-legends-charley-johnson/

          • Jeremy

            Elway, Peyton, Morton, plummer, Tebow, and cutler would all be ranked higher than griese in my book. (exciting playoff win trumps 3 years average play)

      • Jeremy

        Fun Trivia fact, Kubiak is the only QB the Broncos have taken after round 4 who ever won a game for them. Matt Mauck, Jarious Jackson, and John Hufnagel were all 0-1, and all the others never started a game.

        • ohiobronco

          True but #nowitstevortime

        • BlackKnigh

          I may be wrong – but I think Mark Herrmann started the last game in 1982 for them before he was traded to INDI in the Elway trade. He showed some good poise and played fairly well in a losing effort.

          • Jeremy

            You are correct, but he was drafted in the 4th round

  • RSH, Esq.
    • Nick

      I made sure to note this when the comp pick results came out. However, because it’s not a comp pick it is tradeable, so there may be a good chance that they won’t have that goofy Mr Irrelevant jersey with #253 on it in the Broncos version.

      • bradley

        I’d like to see them use it on the next Karl Mecklenburg (12th round pick).

  • Lonestar47

    Antichirst Here.

    What folks seem to forget on the injury aspect is it is over shadowed by the millions they are paid for playing a tuff game.

    Any of the players with intelligence above a medmuim IQ understand injuries are part of the game and the millions they are being paid.

    Most that have retired went into the game knowing that at 50 they would be hardly able to walk, that every morning it would be a struggle to get out of bed.

    Hey I have news for most on here after 60 for us normal folks getting out of bed in the am is no easy thing. More parts hurt than the ones that do not.

    So I have zero pity for those that made millions (mostly squandered on early in their life playing a game. For the most part many of them got lucky and had athletics That saved them From dying young either on a street corner, being in jail for most of their life because they decided that getting an education was not important.

    Did there environment have something to do with that? Sure but many folks rise above it is the same neighborhood.

    / end rant.

    • Carsonic

      “Antichrist here.” LOL! Sincerely glad to have you around, LS.

      I think there is some truth in what you say, but knowing that some day earlier than most you’d have a hard time getting out of bed because everything hurts is different than knowing your brain might not function right and you might become suicidal. I think folks have the right to make whatever compromises and bargains they want, as long as all the facts are available and presented thoroughly, instead of obscured or outright lied about.

      • Lonestar47

        Hey loads of older folks suffer from CRS. My mother in law has Alzheimer’s and never played a minute of sports except as a girl in those Nazi kids camps. I suspect never had a hit to the head in her life, so shit happens and again zero pity for those that made millions having there head turned into mush.

        One wonders how many those players way back with leather helmets had CTE. Or if by making the players safer with this ad dollar helmets, face guards, eye shields, pads that are light in weight, flack jackets Etc Etc Etc, was really the reason for all of this.

        BTW I’ve always played Devils advocate in many opines. This anti Christ name today.

        • Carsonic

          I have seen theories that helmets make players feel more invulnerable, therefore they behave more dangerously and that there are fewer head injuries in rugby because they don’t wear helmets. (OTOH, they have more spinal injuries.)

          • Dirty_Sancheese

            should the NFL replace helmets with Zorb balls?

          • Carsonic

            Definitely!!

    • MarsLineman

      How do you feel about new NFL owners? They profit off this without putting themselves at any risk. And they make much more than any player

      • T. Jensen

        It’s their money and their investment. They know the risks financially. If the NFL goes bankrupt due to concussion lawsuits or players unwilling to participate or losing fan base then they’ll lose money.

        If they want to take the risk to continue business as usual one of those things will eventually happen. They can mitigate that risk by implementing better concussion protocols, medical benefits etc.

        • MarsLineman

          Right, but I’m talking about the moral implications of profiting off of other people’s suffering. And financial risk ==/== health risk. I’d rather go bankrupt than lose my mind.

          Plus we’re setting aside the fact that the NFL is in fact a legal cartel, allowed to exist via an anti-trust exemption. So even the financial risk of NFL ownership is (historically) almost nothing.

          “The Sports Broadcasting Act was passed in response to a court decision which ruled that the NFL’s method of negotiating television broadcasting rights violated antitrust laws.”

          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sports_Broadcasting_Act_of_1961

          • Good points.

            I think they may have ended their tax exempt status as of April 28th, 2015. So, they may have financial risks now that they didnt have back then.

            http://www.wsj.com/articles/nfl-to-end-tax-exempt-status-1430241845

          • MarsLineman

            Thanks, I didn’t know there was a change. And it definitely does seem like there are financial risks now that didn’t used to exist (like the ongoing CTE research).

        • Steven_Searls

          I’m sure in the future it will be androids replacing humans anyway, so ….

      • Lonestar47

        Any risk ?

        Buyin a team for millions (back when they were cheap) spending millions more on top picks that last a few years. While they are not risking physical injury they risk there money.

        In the case of the NFL the franchises have risen in value. Because it is a good investment.

        But they risked their entire value in buying a team.

        • Kyle Milligan

          if information was withheld from them that would uncover more perceived financial risk while they made their decision whether to buy a team, there would be a major suit.

    • RSH, Esq.

      In 2011, I wrote this as part of a paper during my final semester of law school.

      The Restatement (Second) of Torts determines that a “plaintiff’s assumption of the risk of harm from an abnormally dangerous activity bars his recovery for harm.”[1] Under the assumption of the risk theory, those who voluntarily play football for recreation or for monetary gain “give . . . express consent to relieve the defendant of an obligation of conduct toward him, and to take his chances of injury from a known risk arising from what the defendant is to do or leave undone.”[2] Thus, “[t]he result is that the defendant is relieved of legal duty, he cannot be charged with negligence.”[3] Specifically, “[p]articipants in active, competitive sporting contests—football, for example—often must expect negligently caused physical injury.”[4] Additionally, “[a] number of courts have now said that in sports and games cases the defendant owes only the duty to avoid reckless or wanton injury, instead of saying that plaintiff assumes the risk of ordinary negligence.”[5] This appears to be the approach taken by the majority of courts, with few still relying on an ordinary negligence standard for harms sustained while engaged in an athletic contest.[6] However, for the doctrine of assumption of the risk to absolve defendants of a duty and to leave plaintiffs remedy-less, the activity must not be against public policy.[7] Nevertheless, with growing concern over the sheer number of head injuries and their devastating effects, at what point will the assumption of risk no longer serve as a shield to claims of liability for such injuries?[8]

      1. RESTATEMENT (SECOND) OF TORTS, § 523 (1989).

      2. W. PAGE KEETON, ET AL., PROSSER AND KEETON ON TORTS, 480 (5th ed. 1984).

      3. Id.

      4. DAN B. HOBBS, THE LAW OF TORTS, 548 (2000).

      5. DAN B. HOBBS & PAUL T. HAYDEN, TORTS AND COMPENSATION: PERSONAL ACCOUNTABILITY AND SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY FOR INJURY, 318 (5th ed. 2005).

      6. Id.

      7. KEETON, ET AL., supra note 68, at 482; RESTATEMENT OF CONTRACTS § 575(1).

      8. Gerard Magliocca, Assumption of Risk and Football, CONCURRING OPINIONS (Dec. 14, 2009, 7:51 AM), http://www.concurringopinions.com/archives/2009/12/assumption-of-risk-and-football.html.

    • Yahmule

      “For the most part many of them got lucky and had athletics That saved them From dying young either on a street corner, being in jail for most of their life because they decided that getting an education was not important.”

      What a fucking racist idiot.

      • Dirty_Sancheese

        I think Peyton Manning would have ended up in prison for selling crack if he didn’t find football.

        • Nick
        • ohiobronco

          As it was, he only got investigated for showing crack.

          • MarsLineman

            ha, took me a minute to figure out the joke.

            And actually, Naughright’s story seems physically impossible. If someone is bending down and inspecting your ankles, how exactly do you position your junk on their head without them noticing? You’d have to stand up. Or if standing, you’d have to bend a knee/ stoop. Either way, it would be immediately noticeable to someone studying an ankle that the person was re-adjusting. Doesn’t make any sense to me.

            Unless Manning is really just *that* much of a man?

          • ohiobronco

            Please tell me you didn’t do a reenactment to test the story.

          • Sparks

            “Honey, come here for a second and pretend like your inspecting my ankles. Tell me if you can feel something on your head.” 🙂

          • MarsLineman

            Like any good scientist, I always test my theories. My “wife” wasn’t pleased

        • T. Jensen

          No but Ryan Leaf came close to that

      • Kyle Milligan

        We need to start a petition that lodestar change his name. I don’t like that his opinions are associated with a moniker for my state.

        PLEASE EVERYONE don’t assume all Texans are anything like lonestar! There are plenty of us who are forward thinking. Besides if you judge us all based on him, you’re kinda doing what he did today :p

    • cjfarls

      Besides your borderline racist assumptions about the players, I actually don’t totally disagree.

      The big thing is the voluntary assumption of known risks. To the extent that the NFL is open and transparent about the known risks, then folks can make their own decisions about whether the compensation justifies the harm. This is a free market, and the compensation will be determined by those negotiations and our willingness as consumers to fund the whole shabang.

      My biggest problem with the NFL/woeners is that historically at least, they have down-played the CTE risks, even when there is/was clear evidence that they know better. Then we aren’t talking about a “free market” transaction, because the “playing field” is not equal in terms of the information. One of the assumptions of a free market is “perfect information”, and if the powerful entity is intentionally hiding info… that isn’t okay IMO.

      • Yahmule

        Borderline racist?

        • cjfarls

          I was trying to be charitable…. but yeah.

  • RSH, Esq.

    This obviously is not football related, but for the Batman fans out there, this is pretty cool.

    https://twitter.com/TheEconomist/status/714835452855980032

    • Yahmule

      That movie looks bad, though.

    • Dirty_Sancheese

      I didn’t know Ben Affleck was that tall, thanks for educating me.

      • RSH, Esq.

        Hahahaha. That’s why I am here. Dropping useless offseason knowledge like no other.

    • InSiemianWeTrust

      … But what are their hand sizes?

      • Sparks

        And 40 times? Shuttle cone drills?

        • InSiemianWeTrust

          I’m also interested in vocal range.

  • RSH, Esq.
    • Kyle Milligan

      I Still get chills man……

  • RSH, Esq.

    https://twitter.com/NFL/status/714840810836066307

    Is this a smoke screen to induce teams into trading up?

    • Royalwithcheese

      I don’t think Goff will be there at 8 anyway, and the Eagles wouldn’t take him if he were there. Just a team covering its bases to me.

      • SterlingMalloryArcher

        I don’t know… I mean, I agree he might not be available but I’m don’t know why they wouldn’t take him. Bradford has a two-year contract and Chase Daniel is a career backup. If I’m the Eagles, I certainly wouldn’t rule it out.

    • Rhett Rothberg

      Small hands, smells like cabbage…

      • RSH, Esq.

        Are you talking about carnies or the quarterback prospects in this draft? https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=ZXRfnIfFYFI

        • Rhett Rothberg

          Well….I mean….is there a difference?

        • Kyle Milligan

          You know, I still wonder what’s wrong with Hugh Grant for cheating on 1990s Elizabeth Hurley. . . .

      • Kyle Milligan

        Didn’t know he was a carnie!!

  • RSH, Esq.
    • Nick

      Oh no, this is terrible. Just seeing all the condolences from people across the NFL, and Aaron has been able to keep upby issuing gratitude to each and every one of them.

  • RSH, Esq.

    Ed Reed as a head coach? His team’s identity would certainly be tough, physical, and smart.

    https://twitter.com/NFL/status/714852166561873920

    • Yahmule

      Gonna be hard for him to yell at a guy for freelancing. 8~)

  • Yahmule

    Born in a different era has always been a bullshit excuse for prejudice, bigotry and maintaining fucked up power structures.

    These owners are in a much different position than we are. They get to see the after affects to the game because they see these players at functions related to the team. Robert Irsay and his idiot son, were both well aware of Colt great John Mackey and his devastating injuries from the game. To suggest otherwise is to give them an out they don’t deserve. For some silver spoon asshole like Jim Irsay to compare the life altering injuries these guys sustain to a potentially adverse side effect from aspirin is sickening and there’s no excuse for it.

    • ohiobronco

      Self awareness is not one of Irsay’s strong points. Actually I’m not sure what his strong point is.

      • Yahmule

        His sole redeeming characteristic was his friendship with Edmund Kaiser.

        • Kyle Milligan

          Thank whoever you thank for that one!

          Maybe Kaiser should have been in the bracket?

  • Jeremy

    Does anyone see the irony today. In one thread we are glorifying one of the hardest hitters in the league, who no doubt caused numerous concussions and long term health affects for opposing players. In the other thread we are bashing owners, who didn’t actively stop such hits from occurring.

    • MarsLineman

      Right, but if you want to affect change, you have to start at the top. The owners make the rules, not the players.

    • Yahmule

      I’m bashing owners for their deceptive behavior and willingness to lie straight to player’s faces, not only about the severity of their individual injuries, but of the long term effects of concussions and the obvious link to their game.

      • Jeremy

        and I’m not saying the owners don’t deserve criticism or that Atwater is some villain. I just think it’s ironic, and if you think health affects are so atrocious the league should be held liable for billions of dollars in damages, you should stop glorifying the hits that caused the billions of dollars worth of negative health affects

        • Yahmule

          That would be nice. The NFL was running Chuck Cecil out of the league for his inability to stop trying to kill defenseless receivers while simultaneously marketing his hits (among others) in official videotapes.

    • WhoShotBobbyHumphrey

      I just had a conversation with my in-laws this Easter about the future of football. My wife just had our new born son, and my family knows I’m a hard core football fan, but they were surprised I said I would rather him not play. I imagine full contact little league, and high school football will be gone within the next 10-15 years as we know it, if its there at all. I started playing full contact at age 8, and I can’t believe the differences in how its being coached today. We were taught to lead with our head in almost all circumstances (tackling, blocking, engaging with a tackler), but not to drop our head. As much as I loved my time playing, I wonder what sort of toll it took on my brain, and body for zero dollars. The problem is, I LOVE WATCHING FOOTBALL. So does most of America, so its going to interesting to find a balance between player safety, and keeping the sport enjoyable to watch. If we lose high school football, I think we will see a drop in talent in the pros, as talent scouting and training starts early for these kids. Back to your subject, yes it is ironic, and yes I will glorify Steve Atwater for the rest of my life. Epitome of Safety badassness. I miss that guy!

  • drewthorn

    I recall attending a game where local Greatest Bronco of All Time candidate Steve Atwater knocked three hapless Colts out of the game by half time. I had awesome seats that day, and he hit Roosevelt Colvin (I believe…Roosevelt somebody) in a way that mimicked the sound of kicking an empty bucket. Colvin tried to get up but he’d stagger and swoon wildly and fall down and his teammates finally had to hold him down. He was that out of his mind. Atwater hit another guy so hard on the sideline that you could hear his sort of agonized yelp as the air shot out of his lungs. I can’t really explain the sound other than to say that it hurt, very badly, and if you heard a guy on a street make that sound, it’d probably scare you, and you’d probably yell “Call 911!” before you even had a chance to get to him and access his injuries. He was down for quite awhile.

    None of the brutality of football stuff is new, and as much as it is fashionable to view ownership as the modern day Evil Empire, grotesque violence has always been taking place, and will continue to take place, and it happens through our worship and our enthusiastic economic consent. Steve Atwater is largely a local hero because he was a particularly ruthless and violent competitor in a sport full of them. Steve Atwater is also obsolete, because while football can never be perfectly safe, real efforts have been made to dial down the risk. The NFL deserves some credit for that.

    Besides, isn’t it sort of a discredit to the average NFL player to suggest that he is so easily exploited? That the NFL has been able to dupe him into dangerous behavior in the blind pursuit of money? Is the average NFL player really so simple and naive that he is blind to the considerable risk he is taking? I think the person who suggests that that is the case needs to take a hard look at how they really view of matters of race and socio-economic standing.

    • MarsLineman

      There’s some truth here. The NFL has always been a violent sport. But I don’t think the enormity of the effects of CTE could’ve possibly been anticipated.

      Telling a warrior in battle that he may be handicapped for the rest of his life, and he’ll tell you that it’s part of the bargain. That’s the warrior mindset. But what if you told him that he’d slowly lose his mind, become a burden to those who love him, and eventually take his own life?

      • drewthorn

        Thirty some years ago an old fashioned country doctor really upset my parents when he explained to them that my brother, who just suffered his second concussion, was in real danger of having life long consequences if he had a third. He doubled down on the warning by pointing out, that for reasons not fully understood, my brother was far more susceptible to being concussed in the future. This idea that repeated blows the head might be bad isn’t new.

        I get that the discovery of CTE is huge and.that it adds a considerable wrinkle to the inherent danger of the sport. What I take issue with is the idea that the NFL has the real ability to cover this up, or that by its classification and definition, the discovery suddenly revealed a danger that wasn’t already accepted and understood. At the very least, we spectators, and the players themselves, are complicit in the conspiracy.

        • Yahmule

          There is certainly complicity, but hardly equivalency. Were you suppressing concussion studies and trying to intimidate doctors?

          • drewthorn

            I guess I just reject the idea that the NFL was trying to hide a closely guarded secret. Maybe they were arrogant in thinking they could do that, or maybe they underestimated the base intelligence of the masses, but the revelation that repeated blows to the head could result in some really bad consequences wasn’t– or at least shouldn’t have been– an incredible bolt from the blue.

        • MarsLineman

          It’s a matter of degree. To compare our two statements, “having life long consequences” (as told by your doctor) is much easier to dismiss than confirmed cases of “slowly los(ing your) mind, become(ing) a burden to those who love (you), and eventually tak(ing your) own life”.

          edit- and I’m really sorry to hear about your brother. I hope he isn’t experiencing any sort of long term consequences

          • drewthorn

            He seems to avoided any following on injuries, probably at least partly because my parents put an end to his football playing days, even though neither injury was football related. I guess they realized that him playing wasn’t compulsory.

    • Yahmule

      “Besides, isn’t it sort of a discredit to the average NFL player to suggest that he is so easily exploited? That the NFL has been able to dupe him into dangerous behavior in the blind pursuit of money? Is the average NFL player really so simple and naive that he is blind to the considerable risk he is taking? I think the person who suggests that that is the case needs to take a hard look at how they really view of matters of race and socio-economic standing.”

      Oh, is that how they get guys to play through life altering injuries, they way Bill Belichick callously did to another local hero named Ted Johnson? By appealing to their greed? Not by telling them they’re letting all of their teammates down and questioning their courage and dedication? Do you understand the pressure an older person in a position of authority can exert on someone that controls their career?

      • InSiemianWeTrust

        NFL players are modern day gladiators in many regards.

        • RSH, Esq.

          “Football players, like prostitutes, are in the business of ruining their bodies for the pleasure of strangers.” —Merle Kessler

      • drewthorn

        There is a difference in depending on a livelihood and depending on insane wealth and fame. Ted Johnson probably didn’t necessarily chose between Patriot LB and the Grapes of Wrath. I don’t think he was in quite that kind of bind.

        That said, I’m not an insensitive ogre. I get the impossibility of that sort of pressure. But I also believe that somewhere along the line, Ted Johnson had ample opportunity to understand the potential pitfalls of his dream. I doubt that Belichick was the first tunnelvisioned asshole that he encountered in his way to being worshipped in Boulder and beyond.

  • RSH, Esq.
    • Jeremy

      Looks like it was deleted. What did it say?

      • RSH, Esq.

        Darn. The tweet was a card someone made for Adam Gase’s birthday. The card contained a funny picture of Gase as a teenager in his high school football jersey.

      • T. Jensen

        I hadn’t refreshed. Here’s a screen capture

  • RSH, Esq.

    According to Walter Football, the Broncos have met with the following draft prospects.

    Quenton Bundrage, WR, Iowa State (PRO)

    Juston Burris, CB, NC State (EW)

    Devon Cajuste, WR, Stanford (EW)

    Maurice Canady, CB, Virginia (SR)

    Jeff Driskel, QB, Louisiana Tech (PRO)

    Parker Ehinger, G, Cincinnati (EW)

    Joshua Garnett, G, Stanford (COM)

    Quentin Gause, OLB, Rutgers (PRO)

    Javon Hargrave, DT, South Carolina State (EW)

    Devon Johnson, RB/FB, Marshall (EW)

    Daniel Lasco, RB, California (COM)

    Malcolm Mitchell, WR, Georgia (SR)

    Dadi Lhomme Nicolas, OLB, Virginia Tech (SR)

    Robert Nkemdiche, DT/DE/3-4DE, Ole Miss (PRI)

    Dak Prescott^, QB, Mississippi State (STM, WOR)

    D.J. Reader, DT, Clemson (COM)

    Rashard Robinson, CB, LSU (PRO)

    Mike Rose, DE, NC State (PRO)

    Hunter Sharp, WR, Utah State (EW)

    Tajae Sharpe, WR, Massachusetts (EW)

    Sterling Shepard, WR, Oklahoma (SR)

    Nelson Spruce, WR, Colorado (COM)

    Joe Thuney, G, NC State (EW)

    Halapoulivaati Vaitai, OT, TCU (COM)

    Nick Vannett, TE, Ohio State (PRO)

    http://walterfootball.com/ProspectMeetings/ByTeam.

    • Sparks

      I’m surprised to not see a safety in this bunch, unless some of these CB’s can play safety. While our two starters are entrenched, behind them is wide open. Bruton is gone. Bolden may be a Bear soon. Even Bush signed somewhere, didn’t he? I’ve never been particularly high on Keo and isn’t he coming off a DUI? Looks like we have multiple safety slots open right now.

      • Jeremy

        Also, Darian is a free agent next year and TJ is one after 2017, so time to start finding their replacements.

      • SterlingMalloryArcher

        It’s possible they’ve met with some players that aren’t on this list. Rest assured they’ll draft one.

  • Laces Out

    FFS! NO!

    http://www.nfl.com/news/story/0ap3000000648797/article/josh-mccown-brian-hoyer-options-for-denver-broncos

    Why do Rapaport and Schefter bob their head’s when speaking by the way, is that a requirement to be a spin artist?

    • Nick

      If they’re cut, maybe. If it’s via a trade, hell no.

    • Rhett Rothberg

      So we want the guy Cleveland cut for our QB? That sounds……cool…..I guess.

      • Kyle Milligan

        I agree with your enthusiasm.

        At this point I am hoping they just patched up the o line enough so Sanchez can hand it off and hopefully not run into anyone’s ass

      • SterlingMalloryArcher

        All part of the plan as I see it. Bring in Hoyer or McCown (both are likely better options than Sanchez) and draft one as well. Take Hoyer/McCown, Sanchez, the rookie, and Siemian into camp. Start the winner of the competition between Hoyer/McCown and Sanchez. Cut either Siemian or the vet that loses the battle to start. If it’s Siemian, possibly resign him to the practice squad.

        Then go 12-4 with the best journeyman vet of the bunch, all of which are likely to outproduce last year’s QB.

        If it’s the excitement factor you’re after, you should be rooting for McCown. He’s fearless to the point of foolish at times.

    • Steven_Searls

      Yeah and we were supposed to be interested in Manziel I heard too.

      • Laces Out

        I’ll watch soccer before I root for that clown!!

    • Laces Out

      Here’s to hoping it just dead news time for Rapoport, or he’s telling SF’s side of the story saying they’re keeping Kaep publicly

      HOU and CLE problems are precisely at the QB position, no need for those journeymen

    • SterlingMalloryArcher

      Both Hoyer and McCown are upgrades over Sanchez.

      • Laces Out

        Riiiiggggghhhhhtttttt….

        They’ve been to how many AFC championships?