Biomechanical Draft Preview 2020 (Part 2)

WRs continued

(to read part 1, click here)

Tee Higgins (lateral oriented posterior dominant) shows very high levels of lateral posterior efficiency (both thoracic and lumbar), which combined with his 6’4” frame and leaping ability gives him arguably the greatest ‘above the rim’ ability of anyone in this class of WRs. A long strider with surprising strength as a runner with the ball in his hands, Higgins shows the ability to grow into an excellent route runner, although at present his anterior lumbar areas (particularly medial) appear a bit under-developed. In a career-long sense, Higgins may belong at the top of tier 1 as one of the best candidates to become a very productive long-term WR (particularly paired with a strong-armed QB like Lock). But he may be forced to settle for red zone production and deep shots as a rookie, until his route-running sudden-ness (anterior efficiency) catches up with his impressive lateral posterior frame.

Continue reading Biomechanical Draft Preview 2020 (Part 2)

Biomechanical Draft Preview 2020 (Part 1)

As was argued in the three part biomechanical borrowing series, projecting NFL success for college WRs is very difficult, due to the inherent demands of the position making early success a poor long-term predictor. This then, is my attempt to find the WRs that show the best long-term projection, using criteria as outlined in part 3 of the biomechanical borrowing series. The WRs are broken down into 3 categories

Continue reading Biomechanical Draft Preview 2020 (Part 1)

Prodigies, Child Actors, and Wide Receivers: Biomechanical Borrowing During Development (Part 3)

Among football positions, wide receiver benefits uniquely from biomechanical borrowing. The same kind of exaggerated dramatic movements that make an actor communicative on stage, help wide receivers free themselves from defenders– both at the line of scrimmage and when breaking into routes. Dramatic sudden movement helps wide receivers to quickly/ cleanly get off the line of scrimmage, sudden exaggerated movement helps wide receivers break free of coverage on a route, and borrowed movement helps again (in a slightly different manner) when trying to secure the ball. As such, young wide receivers are subject to many of the same pitfalls of youth borrowing as actors and prodigies. And evaluating young wide receivers for their potential as adult professionals is made difficult by the inherent tradeoffs of becoming successful at a position that benefits so strongly from this borrowing.

Continue reading Prodigies, Child Actors, and Wide Receivers: Biomechanical Borrowing During Development (Part 3)

Prodigies, Child Actors, and Wide Receivers: Biomechanical Borrowing During Development (Part 2)

The Art of Exaggeration

If you’ve ever been backstage after a play– and before the actors take off their makeup– you’re familiar with the concept of ‘stage makeup’. Actors onstage use enormous quantities of makeup (so much so that it looks grotesque up close), so that when seen at a distance in a large theatre, they appear expressive and natural.

Continue reading Prodigies, Child Actors, and Wide Receivers: Biomechanical Borrowing During Development (Part 2)

Informal Musings: Drew Lock Mid-Season 2019

Hi guys, last time I weighed in on the Drew Lock situation, I framed it as a response to Tyler Polumbus’s tweet. Which, in retrospect, was probably not the best way to present my opinion of the situation. So I hope you won’t mind if I therefore clarify my stance, and also share what I observed when I went back and studied Drew Lock’s preseason footage.

Continue reading Informal Musings: Drew Lock Mid-Season 2019