• bradley

    One year ago, I mentioned to the young clerk in a small store, that it was the 73rd anniversary of D Day. He had no idea what I was talking about.

    • Nick

      We’re getting pretty close to simply not having enough people alive that were significantly moved by that day. Some day, probably when all of us are dead, the same may emerge true of September 11th.

      • JMac

        I take my citizenship oath on Monday (hooray!) but for those who aren’t familiar with the citizenship process, one of the parts you have to complete is an oral civics test.

        2 weeks ago i passed all the citizenship tests and requirements, but leading up to it, I did a decent amount of practice exams for the civics test. Mostly it was via a couple of Apps on my phone. There are 100 or so possible questions they can ask. They only ask you 10 and you have to get 6 right.

        One of the fun games I had was handing the tests to people at parties to see how they would do… Some did well, some not so much. A couple of observations:

        1) It’s amazing how many questions native-born Americans got incorrect (even though the apps are multiple-choice, and the actual exam is not… just an oral answer)
        2) It’s pretty strange some of the questions that USCIS believe make a good civics test. Some are around history, some around government – those are fine, but there were quite a number that I just didn’t understand the purpose for putting them in

        • JMac

          I guess that was a little OT, but the comment on historical days and eventually people not remembering it sparked the thought.

        • Nick

          Congrats!

          What were some of the questions that you didn’t understand being put in?

          • JMac

            Who is the current Chief Justice of the united states
            If the President and Vice president can’t serve, who’s next (Super interesting, just not sure why you would need to know to become a citizen)
            What is the last day you can send in federal income tax forms…
            What year was the constitution written
            Name one of the writers of the Federalist papers
            What is one thing Benjamin Franklin was famous for (First postmaster General, and writer of ‘Poor Richards Almanac’ are both correct answers)
            What ocean is on the East coast of the united states
            Name one US territory (I like that one – I wanted to get it so I could say Northern Mariana Islands)
            Name one state that borders Canada (did you know there were 13 of them??)
            Name two national U.S. holidays

            As I mentioned, all cool questions, but as a requirement for citizenship? Strange…

          • Yahmule

            20 question practice test.

            https://my.uscis.gov/en/prep/test/civics/view

            What is your native country, JMac?

          • JMac

            Australia – Which is sadly becoming more and more of a Nanny-state

          • Carsonic

            JMac, eh? That could be confusing. Do you mind if we call you Bruce?

            (Sorry, I couldn’t help myself.)

          • JMac

            I prefer Sheila…

          • Yahmule

            One 14th the population of the United States in a comparable landmass to the contiguous 48 and all that coastline. It seems like that would be hard to screw up. I guess being an island presents a problem since so many goods, including black market items, need to be imported.

          • JMac

            Are you saying they should import more Nannies?

          • Yahmule

            I can only speak about Australia is the most general terms because I’ve never spent any time there. You have the ability to make informed comparisons about each country and culture. I never much cared for the term Nanny State because so many insincere populists have used it to whip up support over the years.

          • JMac

            You know, that’s a good point. It’s a phrase that has lost meaning through over-use.

            I haven’t lived there in many years, but I do keep up with the news tangentially. The way I’m defining nanny-state is:

            – Complete removal of personal responsibility
            – over-regulation everywhere
            – A tendency to play to the media in government: for example, every time someone breaks a law, there is outrage, and a NEW law specific to that circumstance is implemented… EVEN THOUGH A LAW WAS ALREADY BROKEN!

            one example off the top of my head – a couple of incidents over a few week where people in pubs hit people with their glasses or beer bottles… known as “glassing”. Completely comes under current assault laws. But they enacted specific glassing laws for both the glasser, but also the place where it happened. Some bars were no longer allowed (by law) to serve drinks in glasses, had to be plastic.

            Gross generalization and only one specific example, but this is the place with fixed radar detectors all over the place, and they WILL fine you for going 1 mph over the speed limit…

          • Yahmule

            Jim Jeffries used to taunt his British crowds for having to have all their drinks served in plastic cups. “The British really aren’t responsible enough to drink out of glasses; we’re the only country that uses “glass” as a verb.”

            Now plastic beer cups have come to your native shores, Jim. :~)

          • Rob Rooney

            100%! I guess that means I get to stay!

          • JMac

            Well done!

            I got 20/20 in 4 mins, but I’ve been practicing 🙂

          • Yahmule

            Well done! My family would have harbored you if it ever came to that. :~)

          • bradley

            Me too. I was surprised (shocked?) to learn that only males have to sign up for the draft.

          • Nick

            Rostker v. Goldberg is one of the worst Supreme Court cases that’s still good law, and it if can’t be overturned, Congress should supersede it–preferably by abolishing it altogether.

          • WhirlingDervish

            Woot.. 20 of 20 🙂

          • Nick

            I agree. I think most Americans could only correctly answer Nos. 3, 7, 9 and 10. And even I couldn’t nail Nos. 4 and 6 with precision. (First thing I thought of with Franklin was the lightning rod.)

            I’m a radical when it comes to non-native born people being in this country–I see no good reason why anyone should be barred from living, working, or traveling in any place. Citizenship is a more difficult question for me. There should be some criteria in order to become a citizen, but I’m struggled in figuring out what that should be. Your experience has got me thinking deeper about it.

          • JMac

            There are some interesting ones about rule of law… It took me a little while to figure out why, but then I realized not everyone comes from a system of Government similar to the US. If you come from a dictatorship or a theocracy or an oligarchy then understanding how democracy and the rule of law is (theoretically) different is important.

        • Sparks

          Wait a g’damn minute….have we been talkin’ with a g’damn illegal all this time?? this is ‘murica buddy!
          Seriously though, congrats on your citizenship. 🙂

          • JMac

            LOL! Legal permanent resident for 12.5 years – Got a greencard and everything!! 🙂

            Mind you, it’s not so green…

          • bradley

            Just curious – why did you wait so long?

          • JMac

            As a legal permanent resident and and Australian citizen, the main things I can’t do are vote, serve on a jury and hold public office… outside of that I have pretty much every right of a Citizen. There was no real reason to.

            The other reason was the oath of allegiance. While in practice you can hold duel citizenship because the US does not force you to give up other citizenships, the first part of the oath states:

            I hereby declare, on oath, that I absolutely and entirely renounce and abjure all allegiance and fidelity to any foreign prince, potentate, state, or sovereignty of whom or which I have heretofore been a subject or citizen

            I want to keep my Australian citizenship, and I did not want to take an oath if I felt I could not uphold it.

            Over time I realized a couple of things – right now, my allegiance IS to the US. I’ve lived here over a decade, and plan to continue to live here. Also, there is a significant difference between citizenship through birth and citizenship via choice/oath:
            – Citizenship via birth mainly revolves around the rights conferred on you by the country, and the responsibilities the country has towards its citizens. There is no citizenship test taken and birth or conferred through the years. most of the onus is on the country.
            – Citizenship via oath is different. It’s a trade. We will give you rights and protections as long as you promise certain things.

            My promising certain things to the US does not automatically mean that Australia can no longer offer me rights and protections – until a time where the two are in direct conflict – so I don’t feel the need to renounce those birth-applied rights.

            And then there’s Trump.

            I started the process before Tump got into office, because I wanted to vote. I figured I can’t very well complain about who gets into office if I have the opportunity to vote and don’t take it… Unfortunately, this has been a VERY long process… But I’ll be able to vote next time.

            Until the threat of Trump I didn’t feel the pressing need to have my voice heard. Now I do.

          • bradley

            Reason I asked – ten years ago I represented Karl, who had lived almost all his life in the US but was a French citizen. He had a green card and all but had had some legal problems in Colorado (he was currently living back east). Anyway, a routine background check turned up two arrest warrants from Colorado, which meant no green card renewal and eventual deportation.
            Thanks to some awesome legal maneuvering, I got the warrants canceled and a few months later Karl sent me a photo of him and his lady friend. Karl was holding his citizenship certificate and had a huge grin on his face.
            His reasons for not going through the process were much thee same as yours.
            (The warrants would not have been a problem for a citizen, under Karls circumstances.)

          • JMac

            That’s awesome!

          • Sparks

            All good stuff but I would upvote for this line alone – “I figured I can’t very well complain about who gets into office if I have the opportunity to vote and don’t take it” Soooo much this.

            I feel a lot of people complaining about Trump didn’t even vote. I think he is deservedly getting bashed but for those who bash him but didn’t vote when they had the opportunity, they should piss off.

          • Nick

            For most people, the better things are going for them in life, the less likely they are to vote. My guess is that a lot of the anti-Trump non-voters didn’t feel that threatened by the possibility of him winning. Now that he has, they’re more energized to hit the ballot box.

          • Sparks

            I hope you’re right. If nothing else, let that be a lesson to them. Nothing is a given in the political landscape.

          • JMac

            Speaking of voting I read this article yesterday that was astounding about the lack of protections on voter data:
            https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2018/06/campaigns-are-totally-reckless-with-voter-data-activist-tells-ars/

            Also, check out the North Carolina State board of Elections website where you can look up data by name – it doesn’t even have to be exact:
            https://vt.ncsbe.gov/RegLkup/

            Name, Race, Home address, Registered party, Voting history, method of voting each time (in-person or by mail) and even where their election day voting place is… That’s just truly unbelievable…

        • gnasses

          Congratulations. You are to be commended, sir. When my sister-in-law passed and took her oath, she was so deservedly proud and happier than I have ever seen her with the possible exception of her wedding day.

          I was surprisingly pleased when my daughter’s Jr. High decided this year to require all 9th grade students to take the citizenship exam. (Just have to take it, don’t have to pass it.)

          • Yahmule

            My sister-in-law passed hers last year.

    • Steven_Searls

      This isn’t that unusual. I remember surveys from two decades ago that had similar results on what most Americans knew about our history. I’ve been a history buff most of my life and it always amazes me when I find out that something I was taught or read about turns out to be false or misleading because of so many omissions in what is taught.

      • Yahmule

        There’s a great book by James W. Loewen, which I’m sure you’re already familiar with called Lies My Teacher Told Me. I went looking for my copy the other day, but apparently it’s one of those books I loaned out and will never see again.

        https://www.amazon.com/Lies-My-Teacher-Told-Everything/dp/1595583262/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1528299209&sr=8-1

      • JMac

        I didn’t love history for most of school. There was a morbid fascination with dates and things that could be put on an exam rather than and understanding and interpretation of events, systems, cultures and intents – particularly how we can learn from those.

        That changed with 1 particular textbook, and a teacher who actually understood the content and could breathe life into the story. I remember some particularly compelling lessons about Machiavelli.

        From there I started reading more history, and that changed everything.

        in my mind, great history teachers are story tellers – not librarians. History shouldn’t be dry, and the focus on examination rather than learning didn’t do it justice. Which is ironic, because my greatest strength in school was that I rocked exams! I hated long-form assignments, assessment tasks and essays that took days/weeks to do, but I could knock out an exam with no problems…

        • Nick

          Same here. I avoided formal history classes in college because I had no desire to write lengthy essays, but I read (and still do read) tons of history online that I feel I learn a lot more from than I would in a classroom.

          • Jason

            One of my favorite classes as an undergraduate was a German history class, covering the period between WW1 and through WW2. It was really a fascinating class, and I actually double dipped on my term paper by submitting it as my final English essay during the same semester.

          • Nick

            Early 20th century history in general fascinates me. I’ve come to believe that that period was among the scariest in human history, and the world has things much better since then.

          • Rob Rooney

            I always felt that the 20 years after WW2 were the scariest and most dangerous. The biggest reason is because nuclear weapons were available while being paired with rockets to make the entire world a viable target. You had two powerful countries who just learned that violence works through winning the war but each took away different lessons from it because of their experiences. And both are figuring out how to leverage nuclear weapons to their advantage while trying not to blow everything up.

            I suppose you could extend it even further, but I feel like the Cuban Missile Crisis was the high water mark and time when the world was closest to the brink.

          • Steven_Searls

            There were a couple other times. This one from 1983, for example was more dangerous, imo: https://www.warhistoryonline.com/featured/real-life-man-saved-worldrussian.html

          • Rob Rooney

            I do remember something about this. I think you are right in absolute terms that it was closer with this, but I was thinking more in terms of an actual intent to start a war and effectively kill everyone. In 1983 it was a technical glitch versus a political decision to go to war.

            Either way, you end up just as dead!

          • Steven_Searls

            Yep.

          • Nick

            Good thing that on the US end Joshua learned just in time that he was playing a strange game in which the only winning move is not to play.

          • Rob Rooney

            But he had to play it to know not to play it….

          • Nick

            I could cede that during that period, people living it could legitimately feel it was the scariest. However, the concept of mutually assured destruction coalesced more as time went by. The proxy wars that the two sides waged were terrible, of course, but I still feel they pale in comparison to the two World Wars.

          • Yahmule

            The bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki were the first and biggest shots fired in the Cold War.

          • bradley

            There was no need to drop them. Japan was finished. No Navy left nor an Air Force.
            The two bombs were just a huge message to Stalin.

          • T. Jensen

            I did that so many times its not even funny. I think only wrote like 10 papers total just constantly recycled them.

        • MattR

          I was watching an interview with Christopher Jackson (the original George Washington in Hamilton and now Chunk on Bull) and he was talking about how he loved history class because his school had no arts departments so that was his opportunity to read stories with interesting plots and characters that were filled with drama. Sounds like he had the exact type of teacher you were lauding.

  • bradley

    Chargers player gives us the first wild Super Bowl prediction of 2018 season

    https://www.cbssports.com/nfl/news/chargers-player-gives-us-the-first-wild-super-bowl-prediction-of-2018-season/

    “The Chargers haven’t made the playoffs in five years, but that hasn’t done anything to diminish the confidence of Melvin Ingram. “

    • Russ

      Haha. Predicted predictably, these predictions are over their predicted value 29 times, under: 3.

    • RSH

      I needed a laugh to start my day.

  • bradley

    Debating win total projections for all 32 NFL teams

    http://www.espn.com/nfl/story/_/id/23645045/nfl-win-total-projections-all-32-teams-2018

    Denver Broncos
    Projected wins: 6.9

    Jeff Legwold’s take: Nobody is saying the Broncos solved all of their worries this offseason, but they should improve more than two wins if the Case Keenum-led offense can avoid the turnover troubles of 2017, when the Broncos finished 5-11 with an eight-game losing streak in the mix. Only the winless Browns turned over the ball more than the Broncos did last season, so if Keenum achieves anywhere close to his performance last season in Minnesota, the offense should be a quality addition to a defense that added Bradley Chubb and has Von Miller in his prime. Prediction: Over 6.9 wins.

    • Russ

      Haha. Predictably predicted, these predictions are over their predicted value 29 times, under: 3.

      • Jeremy

        Three that predicted under were 3 of the bottom 4 teams, Arizona, Cleveland and Miami.

    • RSH

      I am optimistic that the Broncos will finish better than 6.9-9.1.

      • Steven_Searls

        I’m always optimistic until the game starts. Then I’m a stoic pessimist until we are ahead by three scores with less than 2 minutes left in the 4th quarter.

  • bradley

    Rosey Grier and Bobby Kennedy

    http://www.nfl.com/labs/sidelines/rosey-grier/rosey-grier.html

    “How a personal connection with Robert F. Kennedy — and an up-front view of a harrowing moment in history — awakened an NFL star’s social conscience”

    • Carsonic

      Excellent, powerful story. Thanks for posting it.

    • Alaskan

      I have never seen a better article on NFL.com. Thanks for posting.
      Like you, I am old enough to remember when it happened.

      • bradley

        Much better.

  • Yahmule
  • Sparks

    Did anyone else have issues with Disqus yesterday? It was down the whole day for me but started working again this morning.

    • Steven_Searls

      No. But I’ve been down or had issues when others are fine so it might just be your isp or something else unrelated to Disqus. says the non-IT expert

      • Sparks

        Thanks. It’s probably something on my end and judging by the 180+ comments yesterday, it wasn’t a widespread problem.

        • T. Jensen

          I always try this link if I’m having issues

          https://disqus.com/home/forums/in-thinair/

          • Steven_Searls

            Thanks. Bookmarked just in case.

          • Sparks

            Thanks. Bookmarked as well.

          • Nick

            Yes, everyone should bookmark this just in case my server ever has problems.

  • Yahmule

    At least the tiniest modicum of justice will be served in this horrible case.

    June 6, 2018

    • DCJ1

      And even after the recall, the dipshit issued a statement saying he was still proud of his decision in the case. At this point, it is clear he is not only to stupid to be a lawyer, he is too amoral and misogynistic to be considered human.

      • Sparks

        Having zero knowledge in this area and seeing how it obviously doesn’t happen much….can a recalled judge still practice law? Or is being recalled like being debarred (if that’s the right term)?

        • Yahmule

          He should be disbarred, but he still has his license.

          • Sparks

            Agreed. And thanks for the correct term. Don’t know why debarred came to mind.

          • Jason

            Disbarring a judge for issuing a sentence within the statutory guidelines makes no sense.

        • bradley

          He can still practice law.

          • Sparks

            Thanks.

      • Yahmule

        He’s not the only one. Here’s a woman who thought a six month sentence and no sexual offender status in a violent rape was simply a difference of opinion.

        “This is a sad day for the California judiciary,” said LaDoris Cordell, a former Santa Clara County judge who was active in the campaign against the recall. She said the vote sends a message to judges that “if they don’t go along with popular opinion … they can lose their job.”

        LaDoris Cordell is a black lesbian progressive who believes this recall will have negative repercussions in leaps of logic I can’t begin to follow.

        “Without discretion, we are left with cookie cutter justice that imposes mandatory sentences, without any regard for the defendants’ circumstances. ..If Judge Persky is recalled, trial judges in Santa Clara County, and throughout the State of California, will be looking over their shoulders, testing the winds before rendering their decisions,” Cordell wrote in a September opinion piece in Silicon Valley DeBug, called “Why the recall of Judge Persky is terrible for racial justice.” “By sending a message that unpopular decisions may lead to a recall, the campaign threatens the willingness of judges to give individual consideration to defendants at their sentencings. Should this recall succeed in removing a judge for making an unpopular decision, it will be harder for low-income defendants, most of whom are of color, and harder for those who advocate for them, to receive judicial consideration of mitigating circumstances. I’m not just making this up. Several empirical studies have concluded that judges impose harsher sentences when pressured by elections, and that these effects are concentrated on defendants of color.”

        I think this is nonsense and so does Stanford Law Professor Michele Dauber who spearheaded the effort to recall Pervsky.

        Dauber’s email continued: Cordell “contends that the recall will hurt judicial independence and also cause more incarceration of people of color. Neither of these is true. First of all, judges in California are elected. As such they are not fully independent, as in the federal system. They are accountable to the people they serve. That is why the independent, nonpartisan Center on the California Constitution reviewed the question of judicial recalls and concluded that they do not reduce judicial independence in California because they are an infrequently used mechanism for balancing competing value sets of independence and accountability. Second, everyone connected to this campaign supports criminal justice reform. Many of this campaign’s leaders and elected endorsers are people of color, such as Senate Pro Tem President Kevin De Leon and Congressman Ro Khanna. We do not have to choose between justice for women who are victims of domestic and sexual violence, especially women from marginalized communities, and reforming the criminal justice system. Both are important. Our campaign is very clearly about ending impunity for high status offenders like Mr. Turner. I am confident that judges are smart enough to tell the difference between high status, white, college athletes convicted of sex crimes and poor minority drug and non-violent offenders.”

        http://www.ktvu.com/news/unlikely-cheerleader-supports-judge-persky-saying-his-recall-will-be-terrible-for-racial-justice

    • The Color Orange

      Perrish Cox doesn’t see the problem.

    • Nick
      • Yahmule

        I follow him on Twitter and generally agree with a lot of Lemieux’s opinions, but there’s still no reason to believe judges will interpret this decision as one of mandatory lengthy sentences than one of preferential treatment towards a privileged individual. Even if they do choose a different interpretation, using this particular sentence as a benchmark for grotesque leniency doesn’t seem like a bad thing. Are there any circumstances where raping a semi conscious woman on the asphalt behind a dumpster should be viewed as anything else than what it was?

      • MattR

        Seems like the easy solution is to also recall a judge who handed out an obviously too severe sentence 😉

        On a more serious note, I find that argument to be lazy thinking – either by the judges who would be influenced by a one-off case that has nothing to do with the cases they see or by the media for pushing the idea that judges won’t understand the uniqueness of this situation.

      • T. Jensen
  • Hank Mardukis
  • Yahmule

    Madison Bumgarner returned from the disabled list yesterday and he looked very good. He only had two rehab starts, so they limited him to six innings. The numbers aren’t eye popping. He gave up eight hits and two earned runs, struck out three and didn’t walk a batter. I watched several innings and what was most impressive was Bumgarner came back throwing his changeup way more than in the past and righthanded batters couldn’t do anything with it. Like that dude needed another out pitch. The Giants are only 2.5 games off the pace, they’re getting Mark Melancon back as well, and it’s an even numbered year.

    • Sparks

      Heard a stupid joke this morning you may like:
      What do you do with an Elephant with 3 balls?
      Walk him to get the Giraffe up to the plate.

      • Steven_Searls

        Heard worse jokes

        • Yahmule

          This was one of the ten funniest South Park episodes ever. Carlos Mencia tied to a chair pleading for his life while Kanye West interrogates him had me crying.

          https://youtu.be/ADGWPorwkYg

          • WhoShotBobbyHumphrey

            #GayFish

      • DragonPie

        Stupidly hilarious. The giraffe doesn’t even have a way to hold a bat.

        • Sparks

          And an incredibly large strike zone. 🙂

      • Yahmule

        Alright, but it puts the cheetah is scoring position.

  • The Color Orange
    • Yahmule

      Sam, if you were going to stop going to class, why didn’t you just declare in April?

    • Yahmule

      Everybody commenting about the juxtaposition of Josh Gordon and highest player in Schefter’s tweet.

  • Nick
    • pubkeeper

      Looks like a guy who can’t get out of his own way.

  • pubkeeper

    Not sure if this was posted yet. Adam Rank thinks the Broncos can make the playoffs.

    http://www.nfl.com/news/story/0ap3000000935984/article/five-reasons-why-the-broncos-will-make-the-2018-nfl-playoffs

    • Yahmule

      I agree with everything he said. My only real concern for this team is the O line wasn’t addressed in a meaningful way.

      • gobroncos

        Neither was head coaching.

        • Yahmule

          Well, the hope is that, like most people, Vance can learn from his mistakes and he certainly provided himself with a wealth of educational opportunities last season.

          • Carsonic

            And it appears (one would imagine) as if he has had a hand in a lot of the changes in the approach to coaching. We’ll see if they pay dividends, but I feel like if the setup is the way he has organized it rather than trying to fit into someone else’s scheme, he has a better chance of success.

          • Yahmule

            His scope of authority will always be limited in Denver. Elway’s reluctance to cede control is going to probably always keep us from the mini-Shanahan types, but hopefully there’s more cohesiveness in the vision this year.

          • gobroncos

            I’m skeptical. I’ll have to see it to believe it. I think this team had more talent than what our 5-11 record showed, and that’s on the coach. Should have kept Son of Bum as DC.

            I feel like Musgrave will have to save the trainwreck that is our offense despite VJ’s coaching. And if we do fail, VJ will put it on Musgrave. But I have a gut feeling that it won’t be the OC, but the overall attitude that VJ brings to the team.

          • Yahmule

            I thought Joseph did a bad job, but was also 100% opposed to firing him because he was handed a deeply flawed offense and the special teams couldn’t have been worse.

            I have no problem with Joe Woods. He shored up the miserable rushing defense which cost us a shot @ the playoffs in 2016, improving from 28th in the NFL (4.3) to a league best (3.3). We also continued developing young players like Shelby Harris and Justin Simmons under Woods.

          • gobroncos

            I guess I’m not too disappointed in how Joe Woods has done. The issue is that he’s young and upcoming. He’s probably got aspirations to become a head coach. If he continues to do well, he’ll just get snatched away from us for that opportunity. Maybe even next year.

            Wade Phillips has repeatedly shown he’s a great DC, but not so great HC. I think he has resigned himself to being a great DC without HC aspirations. Why fix what aint’ broke? Our defense was great with him, would continue to be great, and there’s really a low likelyhood someone would be able to snatch him away from us barring an astronomical salary.

    • Jason

      I certainly think the personnel is there. If scheme and execution collide I think they are a playoff team.

      • Drewredux

        Lots of pressure on lots of unproven youngsters on offense.

        • Jason

          Yes sir!

  • Steven_Searls

    Forgive me for a little schadenfreude, but it seems the new Raiders management, er, coaching staff is doing their best to alienate their best defensive player: https://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2018/06/06/raiders-are-tempting-fate-by-calling-out-khalil-mack/

    • G Mik

      Meh. We don’t have to look much further than the Von Miller stare down to know this could be nothing and probably is. And who would blame Guenther for wanting Mack at Voluntary Workouts and saying he’ll need to catch up? As a Coach you’d obviously want your “centerpiece” there. That said, I think we’d all love for this to not work out but I don’t think they’re that stupid over there.

      • Steven_Searls

        Hey it’s the Raiders. Let me have a small dollop of joy at the possibility of them screwing up their relationship with Mack.

        • G Mik

          Thank you. I need to be told to STFU at times. Maybe a lot.

      • Nick

        If reports are true that Gruden has practically overthrown McKenzie as GM, then I wouldn’t be surprised if Gruden alienated any of the players McKenzie brought in. Even Derek Carr. Every coach/GM always has a bias to “their kind of guys”.

        • G Mik

          While true, you don’t hear of this happening to the star players who aren’t malcontents and/or lazy. Maybe Gruden just doesn’t give a f though and will blow the whole thing up and start over – they did give him enough run way. Sounds extremely counter-intuitive to me but nothing wrong with a little wishful thinking.

          • Yahmule

            Part of Gruden’s “take it back to 1998” attitude is the dick swinging alpha male coaching tactics that don’t work that well on grown men in this day and age.

      • Yahmule

        That still doesn’t guarantee how Mack will interpret the gesture.

        I was okay with Miller (and the vet WR) skipping OTA’s, but I would have preferred to see them out there. Coming off a 5-11 season and a new QB in place, it would have been nice to see them making an appearance.

        What rubbed me the wrong way was Von talking down the whole idea of OTA’s in general. That’s not worthy of his position as team leader. Can anybody imagine Manning saying, “I mean it’s OTAs. You really can’t put too much into OTAs. Last year in OTAs I thought we were going to win the Super Bowl. You really can’t put too much into it” about any practice session?

        I get that his position group won’t do much in these kinds of workouts, but his presence means more than that.

        • G Mik

          Completely agree on Mack but this feels like a non-story right now. As for Von, he also said they are “brainwashing” us in to thinking OTA’s matter. Dude, you’re a leader on this team – what you need and what they need are two different things and you have to recognize the significance of your words. He probably has the largest psychological size of anyone on the team so his words matter. What makes it worse is how little they already practice because of the collective bargaining so he should definitely understand the importance. Kind of baffling to me.

          • Rob Rooney

            Von is kind of a reluctant leader. He is looked up to for his talent primarily and not the intangibles that guys like Manning and Ware had. This isn’t to say he doesn’t have them, but that doesn’t show through. You see guys respecting him due to the ability but so far he hasn’t gotten the psychological aspect of it down. He is still a young guy but I think his playful nature is too cavalier right now and sometimes he needs to show a harder edge sometimes.

            Peyton could joke and play around with guys, but when they screwed up you knew it because he didn’t hold back. This is something I think Von lacks right now.

        • Kush-Lash

          I think if teams and coaches want players to take OTAs serious they need to collectively bargain for it. They are not mandatory and really, to be ready for Game 1 of an NFL season athletes need 2-3 weeks of live practices. These “practices” are good for QB/WR timing and coaches puffing their chests.

  • bradley
    • Steven_Searls

      Thx for posting. He sounds more focused this year.

      • Yahmule

        I’m glad I watched that. He mentions being calm and collected this year and that interview made it apparent that he’s matured a lot. All that rookie boasting is out the window. He’s a really composed young man now. He accepted all the blame for his rocky moments and deflected any chances he was given to make excuses. One thing we don’t ever have to worry about is this guy buying into the system. I’m really excited to see what progress he’s made this year. Could be substantial.

  • ohiobronco

    Considering that this has happened with the Ravens before, their explanation does not hold much water.

    https://twitter.com/ProFootballTalk/status/1004441119193780226
    https://twitter.com/TomPelissero/status/1004442370321068032

  • RSH
  • RSH

    I really hope that Adam Gotsis is an innocent man. He sounds like he has the size to really help free up our pass rush rushers and to build upon his much improved play against the run in 2017.

    https://twitter.com/NickiJhabvala/status/1004448974181298176

  • RSH
  • RSH

    Touching upon some of the coaching methodology changes that were discussed previously in today’s and past Orange Overviews. I loved Tyke Tolbert, but Denver’s wide receivers may have become too comfortable the past two seasons.

    https://twitter.com/MikeKlis/status/1004432890573144064

    https://twitter.com/MikeKlis/status/1004431474207014912

    • G Mik

      Hmm. I don’t like the sounds of this. I wonder if Azzanni played WR and really knows the position or has just Coached it for a long period. While Sanders is (kind of) saying the right things, I’ll have to watch how this unfolds. Not sure why Tolbert was asked to leave, but I believe he was a pretty good Coach and his shoes could be hard to fill, especially for the veterans. Sounds to me like Sanders has yet to buy in.

      • RSH

        My guess is that Tolbert’s message had grown stale or he had become too chummy with the players. I think Azzani was a good hire. He’s been coaching for two decades now, only five seasons less than Tolbert.

        • T. Jensen

          Not to mention that Tolbert basically only had 2 WR’s (at any time) worth anything the entire time he was here. I know that’s not all his fault but some of the blame should go to him.

        • G Mik

          Yes he is very experienced. But the weird thing about many NFL Coaches is that they don’t really understand the nuances of the position they are coaching regardless of tenure. Maybe they want to be Head Coaches or Coordinators so they have to learn as well. But who suffers in that case? The player.

          They can tell the players where to be and what to do within the scheme but they really don’t understand the position because they’ve never played it and so can’t truly coach it. Mark Schlereth talks about it all the time – “You need to get your head around!” or “you need to get better leverage!” and he would say, “No shit! How do I do that when….?” and they couldn’t answer. To me it’s one of strangest things about the NFL. The Broncos seem to be getting away from that, so maybe you’re right about Azzanni.

          • RSH

            My hope is that Azzani, who has coached every year in college since 1999 except last season with the Chicago Bears, will be more of a practical, hands-on instructor versus merely engaging in theoretical coachspeak, as you alluded to in your comment.

      • Carsonic

        I feel like if there were real tension, Sanders wouldn’t admit to the conflict so easily. He’d be more vague and team-speakish. I think this is a good sign.

  • RSH
    • Broncos777

      Yes, it is.

  • Nick

    Bad news for the Vikings (and Jason).

    https://twitter.com/TonyPauline/status/1004484262081519616

    • Jason

      Wow. Huge bummer.

      • Steven_Searls

        I know, if only losing that name in the NFL this season.

        • Jason

          He was a big leader on the Coug defense. Hard nosed player.

          • Steven_Searls

            Ah, Then you saw a lot of his games as a fan. Of course, it’s always tough for some rookie trying to break into the NFL to lose a year due to injury.

  • Jason
    • bradley

      Ike was a good man and a good general and a good President. The last good and decent Republican President we’ve had.

      • Yahmule

        He was a good man. His only mistake, and it was well intentioned, was allowing the religious right to gain their toehold in the political process. He could have never predicted how badly that would backfire.

    • bradley

      Every gun that is made, every warship launched, every rocket fired signifies, in the final sense, a theft from those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and are not clothed. This world in arms is not spending money alone. It is spending the sweat of its laborers, the genius of its scientists, the hopes of its children….This is not a way of life at all in any true sense. Under the cloud of war, it is humanity hanging on a cross of iron.

      President Dwight David Eisenhower (1960)

  • Nick
    • Nick
      • Steven_Searls

        Unreal. No way you can earn a big contract on the sideline. I feel for the young man.

      • SterlingMalloryArcher

        Makes me love the Chubb pick that much more. Unfortunately, probably drags down Ray’s trade value pretty significantly, meaning we won’t see much return on that first round pick, and the pick given up to move up to get him. Hopefully Jeff Holland is the real deal, and we can entertain offers for Barrett.

        • Russ

          Well, at least there’s comp pick considerations should he show enough to some other team to sign him to a big- (or even not so big) money deal.

          • SterlingMalloryArcher

            Absolutely. I hope Ray comes back and tears it up, for his sake and the Broncos.

          • Nick

            If he has an injury-abridged 2018, he’s likely getting nothing more than a one year prove it deal for 2019, and that could depress the comp pick value.

  • Yahmule

    Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney

    June 7, 2018

    • Yahmule

      That wasn’t the only time he kicked Trump’s ass today.

      June 6, 2018