• bradley
    • They misspelled “Denver Broncos” when they wrote Chargers, but otherwise agree with their choices.

      • Sparks

        Editorial work has really gone downhill in the internet age, hasn’t it?

  • bradley

    The Seahawks’ new Australian punter can kick the ball a mile

    https://ftw.usatoday.com/2018/05/the-seahawks-new-australian-punter-can-kick-the-ball-a-mile

  • bradley

    LaCanfora: Ranking the eight teams that have a legitimate chance of winning the Super Bowl

    https://www.cbssports.com/nfl/news/ranking-the-eight-teams-that-have-a-legitimate-chance-of-winning-the-super-bowl/

    • Drewredux

      The MMQB: Ten Things post-draft podcast on the draft is both pretty good and highly bullish on Denver’s renewed status as a contender.

      I’m not sure I agree on the contender thing, but it’s a good listen (if you have 2+ hours).

      Andy Benoit might be the best pure football analyst working these days. IMO, of course.

      • bradley

        Agree on Benoit.

      • cjfarls

        I think our team should be a solid playoff contender. SD looks tough, and KC/OAK are who knows… but the division seems winnable… and if you can get that far, then anything can happen.
        But a SB over-dog… yeah, no.

        • RSH

          If the Broncos stop shooting themselves in the foot with back-breaking turnovers in 2018, they can be a 10-6 team.

        • Drewredux

          Lots of pressure on some of the rookies and pseudo-rooks Butt and Walker, IMO.

          I’m not sure they have an answer to receiving backs, yet. Slightly more hopeful on Cravens and TE’s.

          AFCW is certainly doable.

          • Yahmule

            The Broncos allowed the fourth fewest receptions and the third fewest yards receiving to running backs last season. They did allow six TD receptions to running backs, but four of them came in the New England game. The misconception that the Broncos are poor at covering running backs comes from Tevin Coleman lighting them up in a game in 2016

          • Drewredux

            Can you find a stat on how many 3rd down conversions have gone to RB’s since the Coleman debacle?

            I honestly haven’t rewatched a second of ‘17, but my recollection is that this defense surrendered insane yardage— particularly through the air— to a large assortment of otherwise ordinary backs.

            I also remember the defense to be situationally poor, particularly in 3rd and manageable and key situations. The opposing RBs and TEs were usually in the middle of it.

          • Yahmule

            I think the biggest problem the defense had the last two seasons is on any given week they had to contend with not just the other team’s offense, but getting hamstrung by their own offense and special teams and occasionally the refs, too.

            I think the reason running backs and tight ends converting first downs might look foreign to us is because it’s been 2.5 years since we’ve seen our offense function like an actual NFL offense and incorporate those basic concepts.

          • Drewredux

            I am perpetually guilty of underestimating the futility of the offense. 😀

          • Yahmule

            I don’t have first down stats, but based on this, running backs tagged us for about 32 yards receiving per game last year.

            https://www.pro-football-reference.com/years/2017/fantasy-points-against-RB.htm

          • cjfarls

            A lot of that is relative though… Talib/Harris/Robey gave up almost nothing, so anything given up by anybody else seemed “insane yardage”… even if they were more average. Even so, the team was a top-5 DEF overall.

            It also gets to scheme… with Von rushing the passer and good DBs covering downfield, it forces teams to dump it off quickly… so even if we are often getting stops, etc., the relative yardage gained by RBs/TEs is going to be higher (similar to how any CB playing opposite Champ probably appeared worse than they actually were, simply because they were being tested more often).

            No DEF forces a 3-and-out every possession… but if given longer fields to defend, IMO our DEF will surrender a lot fewer points, even if they give up a 3rd down to TEs/RBs here and there.

          • FarAwayBroncoFan

            I do wonder how big the Talib-Roby drop off will be.

          • Drewredux

            I’m more worried about the drop from Roby to Brock/Yaidom/Langley.

          • Drewredux

            They got their asses kicked (blown the fuck out) more often last year than probably the last 25 years combined.

            I am not sure that happens to a legit ‘top 5’ D.

            Chubb and a little interior pass rush will go far to fix that. I agree.

          • FloydLittle44

            I rewatched every minute of 2017 and there were way too many coverage breakdowns for an elite defense. The safeties were picked on, including Stewart. Talib sucked in the second half of the season. I think Roby will be fine.

          • BlackKnigh

            Do you know if having Talib on the field made a difference there? Was he playing in the game that Coleman lit them up? Sorry – I don’t remember that game very much. Didn’t Lynch stink it up in that one?

        • Yahmule

          KC will play really well until their rube fans are suckered in again. If the Raiders start even 2-0, the hype over Gruden will be inescapable.

          • RSH

            The Raiders will start out 0-2 with losses to the Rams and the Orange and Blue. 🙂

          • Yahmule

            Oh shit. Didn’t even realize we had them week two. 0-2 start would be pretty hilarious.

  • Nick

    This is such a Ricky Williams thing to do.

    https://twitter.com/CNBC/status/994253215389667328

    • Steven_Searls

      Hey, he stole my investment strategy!

    • DCJ1

      Predictions for 5/10/2018. Nibiru (the twelfth planet for those of you new to this) rises today in the ancient Sumerian constellation of the aardvark. Cojoined with Venus passing through perihelion into tetrahedron, we have a fine chance to move your investments beyond cryptocurrency into mythocurrency. Just like cryptocurrency moved from the physical into the digital world, mythocurrency moves us from the digital into the hypothetical world. No need for real or computerized wallets — you simply think about paying as you leave the store. Unlike physical or cryptocurrency, your mythocurrency is completely safe from theft as it exists only inside your mind.

      For every $1M US, you can get 2M Chimeracoins delivered to you instantaneously by our trained psychics via ESP.

      Note: US funds must be delivered via wire transfer to our Cayman Island bank accounts. Mythocurrency may not be accepted everywhere: any legal misunderstandings that arise from attempting to pay with with Mythocurrency are the responsibility of the user.

      • T. Jensen

        Dang I just sent my last $2m to nigerian prince. This looks like a better deal.

      • BlackKnigh

        This sounds much better than the stuff I get in my email from Nigeria promising me $30B

  • The Color Orange
    • Nick

      I disagree that Gannon is “not in the business of savagery”. He is very good at being critical at the appropriate times, and it’s one reason why he’s one of my favorite TV analysts and should be ranked higher on assignments. He was ruthless on the disaster the Raiders became after he left, and it earned him persona non grata status by Al Davis from there on out. I could have seen him get the Marcus Allen treatment if he was there at a younger age.

    • ltt

      Lynch is Akili Smith 2.0, who never took hold of the starting job. Smith, though, had some teammates in his corner (I remember Houshmandzadeh being complimentary towards him).

  • The Color Orange

    Watch Keenum throwing passes to Broncos receivers. (It’s all we have at the moment.)

    https://247sports.com/nfl/denver-broncos/Bolt/WATCH-Case-Keenum-the-Denver-Broncos-offense-hit-the-practice-field-118104122

    • Drewredux

      Dazed and confused is at least an upgrade over the abject terror we saw in Oz’s eyes and play. 😀

    • QDoc

      MOAR BRONCOS….

  • The Color Orange
    • Sparks

      I wonder what Chad meant when he wrote “The Broncos have taken some strides to bolster the offensive line.”

      • RSH

        The hiring of Sean Kugler, Connor McGovern getting more playing time last season, a revival of Jared Veldheer, Ronald Leary returning to left guard, and Garret Bolles having a year’s worth of experience may be some strides?

        • Sparks

          Yes, those may be “some” strides all right. As I see it now, this is not that improved a line over last year. Improved? Maybe. I especially agree with your Leary and Bolles assessment. Improved enough to make a significant difference? Maybe not. I do appreciate your choice of “revival” but I don’t think it’s very common an OL the wrong side of 30, coming off 2 straight years that they didn’t play a full season enjoying some kind of Renaissance. I’m cautiously optimistic but I’d say it’s just as likely that both Veldheer and Watson end up IR’d as it is that either one plays a full 16 games.

          I’m also lukewarm on McGovern. While his play was elevated over what Garcia was producing, it wasn’t a very high bar. I hope the young man continues to show improvement, though.

          • cjfarls

            I’m just hoping for some baseline competence. If the o-line can play more like it did the last 5 games of last year than it did the 1st 5 games… we won’t be great (or even good for that matter), but at least it won’t implode the rest of the team. If they play like they did the first 5 games, we’ll be drafting in the top-10 again.

          • Sparks

            I’m hoping they play well enough to at last keep Keenum upright. Now that all of our eggs are in that basket, that becomes the paramount goal. I like Kelly and have higher hopes for him than others but if either Kelly or, god forbid, Lynch see significant playing time this year, it will not bode well for our team.

        • QDoc

          I am cautiously optimistic about McGovern. Wasn’t he some sort of weight room champ at Mizzou? Give the kid a chance… I think he could turn out pretty good. As for RT, as long as we can get a combined 18 or 19 games out of Veldheer and Watson we should be fine.

          • Sparks

            Manny Ramirez was also a weight room champ. He set the TT bench press record at 525 lbs, only to best that at 550 lbs the following year. While it is a desirable attribute for an OL, they require more than brute strength to play the position. Like I wrote below, though, I do hope McGovern continues to show improvement.

            As an aside, can you imagine benching 550 lbs? Holy shit.

            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manny_Ramirez_(American_football)

          • QDoc

            I have a hard enough time thinking about benching 225 like they do at the combine. I used to always laugh at the WR or punter who puts up 3 reps… then I realized that it’s probably 3 more than I could do so I should just STFU. I think given a month or so to work on it, I could leg press 550 though.

          • RyanHennigan

            Leg pressing 550 lbs isn’t really lifting 550 lbs though. Something closer to F=Weight x sin(45) = 550 x (0.7) = 385. If you can deep squat 385 you are decently strong.

          • Sparks

            How strong are you if you can bench 550? 🙂

          • RyanHennigan

            Strong enough for national competitions.

          • Tim

            Hey I can do that! I peaked at 3x my bodyweight on a full squat last year.

          • Yahmule

            If I even deep squat nothing now my right knee talks to me for the next three days.

          • Tim

            My right knee is why I had to back off of powerlifting. It started to give me fits, mostly due from playing catcher growing up.

          • Yahmule

            Yeah, it requires not snapping the MFing ball through the MFing end zone in the MFing Super Bowl.

            And no, the concept of benching more than double more max in my prime is fairly inconceivable.

          • BlackKnigh

            I think he pressed 600 lbs. That is over 3 times my body weight @175 lbs.

        • royalwithcheese

          That is a very optimistic take. Personally, I don’t see it with McGovern. If he could play, he would’ve been playing already. The RG position right now is like throwing sh!t on the wall and seeing what sticks: McGovern, Garcia, Turner, Kouandijo, Watson, Dielman, Poutasi. Wouldn’t it be great if one of those guys turned into a league-average player?

          • Tyler

            Regarding McGovern it seems like it often takes O linemen a while to transition to the pro game. Look at Paradis, he didn’t make the 53 his first year and is doing great now.

            I don’t expect McGovern to be as good as Paradis but for him to still be improving at this stage is a pretty reasonable expectation imo.

          • pubkeeper

            I don’t know, I think very few offensive linemen come out of college as finished products. McGovern taking a year to develop seems about right.

          • royalwithcheese

            That was his second year, no?

          • bradley

            Yes, he was drafted in 16.

  • The Color Orange
    • bradley

      That was 24 years ago. The charge was dismissed. Why are they digging there?

      • Tyler

        Seriously. What a scandal!

      • The Color Orange

        They did with Vance Joseph and Peyton Manning.

        • Yahmule

          The accusations against Patricia (basically a gang rape) are far more serious. There were also grand jury indictments.

          https://www.detroitnews.com/story/sports/nfl/lions/2018/05/09/matt-patricia-indicted-sex-assault/34742627/

          • The Color Orange

            No doubt. I didn’t mean to equate the two. I was just pointing out that sexual misconduct allegations from a person’s past are routinely brought up in these situations.

          • Yahmule

            I definitely don’t think you’re equating them. Just saying that the difference in the charges – and the fact that we’re finally beginning to hold monsters accountable for their actions – could be enough to bring Patricia down.

          • royalwithcheese

            How is it that he was indicted but the case didn’t go to trial?

          • Yahmule

            “Victim does not feel she can face the pressures or stress of a trial,” reads a hand-written note above the signature of Cameron County Assistant District Attorney Jacqueline Reynolds-Church in the Jan. 28, 1997, motion to dismiss the case.

            https://www.detroitnews.com/story/sports/nfl/lions/2018/05/09/matt-patricia-indicted-sex-assault/34742627/

          • Yahmule

            Considering the nightmare the accuser in Steubenville endured, it’s not hard to understand how someone in her position would change her mind. One threatening phone call to an already traumatized individual is probably sufficient.

      • Steven_Searls

        The police record was destroyed or can’t be found. Doubtful any physical evidence survives, including the medical report. Accuser chose not to testify. That is not uncommon in rape cases however. Victims past sexual history is fair game if they testify and that’s the single biggest reason most people who report a rape do not take it to trial. Fear of exposure, retaliation, ruined reputation, etc. Plus the trauma of re-living the experience in an adversary court proceeding. That’s hard to overcome. Not saying Patricia is or is not guilty of the charges, but usually prosecutors will not take a case to trial without the testimony of the victim. And there is no way to know what would have come out at trial, whether Patricia and the other defendant would have testified or not, and so forth.

        Regardless, from a PR standpoint this looks bad for him and the Lions, especially since the #metoo movement ignited by the victims of Harvey Weinstein. VJ was lucky his dirty laundry came out before that occurred. Not sure Patricia is going to be able to skate away from this as easily as some others, and again, that says nothing about his guilt or innocence regarding this particular indictment that was dismissed.

        • T. Jensen

          Makes you wonder, for instance if Big Ben were accused today would he still be playing football?

          How many athletes have paid off a victim and just continued like nothing happened? I know Kobe did as well and I’m sure there are countless others.

        • FarAwayBroncoFan

          Just my personal opinion, but a person’s past sexual history ought to be irrelevant. “Discrediting” an accuser to get a guy off, unless that person is a known serial liar, seems blatantly wrong.

          • Yahmule

            Really, we should clarify that to a woman’s past sexual history, because in the history of criminal litigation no man’s sexual history has even been made an issue, unless it was to bring up past criminal behavior.

          • Tyler

            How often are cases of men being raped brought to trial? Pure speculation but I imagine their sexual history would also be brought up, not that it should be (for either sex).

          • Yahmule

            I’m sure you’re right about that. They say male on male rape cases are reported less than 10% of the time, which is pretty easy to believe.

  • The Color Orange
  • Hank Mardukis
    • G Mik

      “Manning, of course, beat the Panthers in Super Bowl 50 in the final game of his NFL career. So, if he accepts Navarro’s offer and if Navarro’s bid wins, this wouldn’t be the first time Manning has owned the Panthers.”

      • Nick

        Deliciously low hanging fruit.

    • Nick

      This would be a typical route to future controlling ownership by first being a minority owner with another team.

  • Nick

    Boo. (And not in the awesome way of booing draft picks and the commissioner.)

    https://twitter.com/AdamSchefter/status/994628405848166401

    • Tim

      While Nashville is a really amazing city to visit, it’s not exactly known for a great fan base. Denver is a much better choice.

    • RSH

      While Nashville is at it, the city can have Amazon HQ2 as well.

      • T. Jensen

        Why wouldn’t you want Amazon?

        • RSH

          Denver has already become expensive enough in the past decade, and particularly in the past five years. To me, the additional rise in the cost of living, increased traffic, and infrastructure costs outweigh the benefits of being selected as the Amazon HQ2 City.

          • T. Jensen

            Austin is a choice as well and has the same problems. Part of me wants it to come so I can sell my house and move some place cheaper though.

          • The 5th Amigo

            What Amazon did the the South Lake Union area of Seattle is horrible. It was a cool neighborhood before. Now it’s traffic jams, construction, and tasteless architecture.

          • WhirlingDervish

            I’ve heard mixed things about that (from locals and others).. I’ve heard that the area was a high-crime area, drugs, etc and pretty much run-down economically starved. I’ve only been visiting the area, and it still seems vibrant, good food scene, and economically flourishing. I suppose you always get multiple points of view on any decision. (I’m more familiar with the SF region, and what’s happened in SOMA and Mission areas

          • The 5th Amigo
          • The 5th Amigo
          • WhirlingDervish

            It sounds like a mixed bag to me. Local laws prevent the city from raising taxes, targeted taxes are illegal, etc. It makes sense for Amazon to fight paying higher (they already pay a large amount). I also know that as part of the their building plans, they’ve put in shelters for battered women (and their children). Progress is always a mixed bag, but this particular issue seems to be self inflicted by the city and population.

          • cjfarls

            Fort Collins is getting big too, but its not Denver yet. And Denver isn’t DC yet.

            Unfortunately, growth is pretty much inevitable… the alternative is depression and stagnation (see Midwest steel towns or any non-touristy rural area). As much as I love the tranquility of smaller, calmer communities – growth is better.

            The real key is appropriate land-use planning, taxes and regulations to manage the growth… yes, that increases land/housing prices even more – but that’s because the managed places are nicer places to live than the unmanaged places… it is the “free market” speaking.

            (and to go off on a total tangent, the best solution to all of this would be a UBI, which would be a giant shot of $$ into rural communities with more people than jobs, and also remove the need for folks to crowd into high growth urban areas just to get employment/$$ to not starve – it would level the playing field).

          • T. Jensen

            I think UBI is too big of a pipe dream, it hasn’t worked anywhere else other than Alaska and that is backed by their oil. How do you fund UBI?

            In my opinion the only viable solution is to make internet more available in rural areas and somehow add tax incentives for companies to hire more remote workers. There is no reason the majority of STEM employees couldn’t telework. Many people relocate to expensive places for employment (though some places Austin, Denver etc have employment and great location) and would prefer to live elsewhere if given an option.

          • cjfarls

            UBI would be a drastic change in our economy/society. It would also be accompanied by repeal of minimum wages, and over the long-term would replace Social Security etc. too… also probably doesn’t work until we have universal healthcare, as without it, medical bills would either make the UBI need to be so big that its untenable on the tax side, or too low to eliminate the need to work. It will require relatively higher taxes on capital and high incomes to pay for it, because low-cost labor is steadily decreasing in relative value. If not phased in over time (perhaps starting as a big increase to the EITC), it will create a giant economic shock that won’t be comfortable.

            I don’t think a UBI was ever really viable in the past… (low cost) labor was too critical an input into the economy’s production function that we didn’t want to undercut it. Even at minimum wages, it was still valuable enough that many businesses required it, and labor itself was a bigger share of economic productivity, so cutting that meant cutting the economy in ways that probably were net negative.

            I think AI is however getting to the point in the next decade or 2 that low-skill labor will essentially be obsolete…. no company will pay a person $15 for what a robot can do for $10. Hell in less than 2 decades 10m+ driving jobs could be obsolete.

            My argument would be we will always have low-skill individuals, and its unrealistic to think we can retrain/raise them up fast enough to outcompete the emerging AI. We are approaching the “singularity”, and when that happens EVERYTHING changes. Low skill labor becomes essentially worthless in the market… what do we do with those 10s, if not 100s of millions of people? We either have an inefficient social safety net that can’t be sustained, we have a UBI, or we let them die… I’ve not really heard any alternatives.
            A UBI with accompanying reductions in minimum wage, etc. “lengthens the tail” where low-skill labor can compete with AI. It essentially is a giant govt subsidy on low-skill labor. But the question isn’t whether we’re going to subsidize low skill folks (unless we choose the “let them die” option)… its how we’re going to do it. I’ve yet to hear a better option than a UBI.

            The math on making it work is hard, but not impossible. Benefit levels would be set so that the lowest 2 quintiles in aggregate roughly “pay for themself” in decreased other benefits. A UBI is not in anyway a boon to the poor. The upper middle quintile of earners would also be set to break even, with new taxes equaling their UBI benefit in aggregate (so if they get a $15k UBI, they also pay $15k more in taxes). The top quintile would more than pay for itself through increased capital/high-income taxes, and that is what we would use to pay for the middle quintile of folks who would see a net gain… The only thing to do at that point is set the benefit amount… the higher the benefit amount, the more taxes those in the top-quartile have to pay. The lower the UBI benefit, the more modest those tax increases need to be…. but its a fairly simple optimization problem, and even those folks won’t be getting the full UBI amount as a net gain. E.g. I believe the 60% income is roughly $75k… say the UBI is $15k/year, but their taxes might increase by $10-12k so on net we only need $3k in extra taxes from those in the top quint… 1 billionaire paying 1% more in taxes can cover a lot of folks getting a $3k/year net benefit. It is a drastic restructuring of the tax system, but probably would be far more economically efficient and the net differences in cash flows are pretty small.

          • BlackKnigh

            UBI would inject some money into every community and put money in the pockets of people who would spend it – stimulating the local economy. Do you know of any countries who have tried it and have a track record? I heard the Switzerland was going to do a test run at the equivalent of $2800/mo. Then I heard that they decided not to do it.

          • cjfarls

            I believe Finland and a Canadian province have done some pilots with promising results.

            At $2800/mo., I’m not sure its tenable… I’d anticipate a US UBI to be maybe half that (plus healthcare – but healthcare reform would pay for itself – there is plenty of money in the US healthcare system already). Costs of living are higher in Switzerland, but that is a big lift.

            Part of the problem is that the best theoretical benefits don’t really show up unless you actually do it. As a tack-on to an existing system, you don’t get many of the efficiency gains that make it so appealing. Its also way too often sold as a program for the poor…. but in practice, it probably won’t help the poor much at all because their other benefits get cut. It probably will actually exacerbate income inequality, while giving a much nicer/more stable floor on the bottom, so “lefties” need to lose their illusions about what it actually will do.

            The things a UBI does do is create cleaner incentives for work (no wage traps where you lose means-tested benefits if you work too much), level the playing field between labor and employers (easier to walk away from crappy jobs that don’t pay enough to make it worth someone’s time), and give non-workers the benefit of their time (that they can use to self-optimize their utility). Those seem like huge societal benefits to me, but its not going to make a poor person less poor.

          • BlackKnigh

            I agree – there has to be a commitment to make it work or you will never see if it really does work.
            If UBI is not possible – I would like to see a scenario of a social safety net such as this in our country. After the GM bankruptcy – Saab – which was owned by GM – was set free. Their cars are still made in Sweden. Part of a Chinese company picked up the model 9-3 and went into production for a little while. They ran out of money and had to shut it down. All of the Swedish workers went back onto their social safety net – which is a little less than what they were being paid. They should be there when production begins again eliminating training an entire workforce.
            Of course – this is not UBI – but it works.

          • Nick

            The biggest danger I see is a city bending over like a pro sports stadium style giveaway on steroids in order to land HQ2.

          • DCJ1

            I think giving a deal for HQ2 is less problematic than a sports stadium. At least with HQ2 the economic impacts and job creation are real, full-time jobs rather than inflated season part-time jobs.

          • Alaskan

            My wife and I thought the Front Range was overcrowded when we left in 1975.
            I really can’t imagine dealing with it now, although a good friend just left AK and moved to Stapleton.
            He has a lovely house, inches from his neighbors, and seems happy as a clam.
            Everything is a trade-off.

  • Yahmule

    Keep sinking lower, you fucking scumbags.

    May 10, 2018

    • DCJ1

      Fat-assed SOB who has never encountered any more psychological stressful than a long line to get a second Big Mac to shove into his gaping maw has the balls to claim torture is okay and to criticize a man who survived the Hanoi Hilton? McCain has more integrity in his little finger than all the people who work for Fox combined.

      Time to start a boycott Fox movement.

      • DragonPie

        Unfortunately, the very few people I know who watch Fox would likely not be swayed by my derision of the network.

      • Yahmule

        Imagine being such a horrific piece of shit that you’re explicitly banned from funerals?

    • Tim

      I will never understand how people that exhibit this level of ignorance get into positions of power and influence. Torture has been proven time and again to be ineffective yet it is still being debated. Then to take a shot at a man that has given everything he has for his country, is just despicable.

      • Drewredux

        They seem to have no consequences, these tactics. Donnie T’s numbers are trending up.

      • Steven_Searls

        It’s very effective at coercing false confessions.

        • Yahmule

          Who would have thought that people would say anything to end techniques that induce their brains into thinking death is imminent?

    • Drewredux

      Unconscionable.

    • Andrew

      So incredibly disrespectful and easy for some fake tough guy to say from the comfort of a TV studio. This guy should get waterboarded on TV and see how that goes.

      • Drewredux

        The torture stuff is just the canvas for a chickenshit swipe at a dying man.

      • BlackKnigh

        That is a great idea! If everyone of those people who allowed these torture techniques would have then used on them – I think there would be less of it.
        If these guys were prosecuted for war crimes and put away for the rest of their lives – I think there would be much less of it.

    • From John McCain’s book, about his torture:

      “Pressed for more useful information, I gave the names of the Green Bay Packers’ offensive line, and said they were members of my squadron.”

      • T. Jensen

        All the more reason to hate him. No one likes a packers fan…

        two points –

        1 there is no way to validate that statement. In fact that line makes me think its too clever/cute and probably fake made up by him.

        2 McCain is a horrible person/politician but his service is not. No one should criticize anyone’s service (captured or no) with the exception maybe of a deserter and even then I think its questionable.

        • G Mik

          I disagree completely that McCain is a horrible person and politician. His views don’t always match up with mine but he has rarely towed the party line and that makes him a better person and less of a politician in my book.

        • Drewredux

          I’m guessing it was fake made up in the White House residence, over a diet coke.

          • T. Jensen

            Most likely, I only make up shit while high on aspartame.

    • BlackKnigh

      I watched some of the Senate questioning Haspel on DemocracyNow today. Not even admitting she made a mistake. No error of judgment.
      Before the hearing – they threw out Ray McGovern who worked at the CIA for about 40 years dislocating his shoulder. Also threw out Media Benjamin. Can’t stand dissent.

  • Drewredux
    • Alaskan

      I like Mayfield. I think he will be the pick of the litter, unless the Cleveland Curse takes him out.
      But we haven’t even seen our new, high priced, QB throw a pass in a game yet.
      What if it turns out that Case is good? I can understand not going QB even if Mayfield was sitting there at 5.
      I don’t understand Elway’s reported infatuation with Darnold and I’m glad we didn’t get to find out.
      Overall, I’m pretty happy with the guys he did select (and the UDFA’s).
      And I’m exceptionally glad Josh Allen is not a Bronco (I’ll eat my crow when he goes to the Pro Bowl)
      Seems like the arrow is pointing up again. But then, every team is unedited, untied and unsecured upon in May.

      • Drewredux

        It seems to me that if Denver had much faith in Keenum, they’d have locked him up longer. That, and the majority of CK’s career keeps me feeling unsettled at QB.

        I liked the draft, too. It would have compounded my fear of opportunity lost if they passed on both Rosen and Mayfield, though.

        • G Mik

          I agree about the duration of the contract. Yet looking at it rationally it is the only way to do it and a positive for both sides. Why tie up anything additional for a guy who you really can’t be certain about until the end of this year, if then. So signing him to a long-term deal wouldn’t make sense.

          On Case’s side – if the Broncos had tried to extend the contract with no guarantees, why would you do it? So it makes sense for both sides and if he plays well, he will very likely stay a Bronco for much longer. Broncos are in that position at the end of the year. Simple and well done.

          • Drewredux

            All good points.

          • G Mik

            I didn’t add in what we both also think – Broncos see him as a bridge and could have very likely drafted a QB this year. Time will tell if that was a mistake but drafting a QB is almost as hard as pulling that straight flush.

        • Alaskan

          I am withholding judgement until we see him in Orange.
          The guy is the all-time NCAA passing leader, so he must know how to do something.
          And it is hard to hold stints with the Texans and the Fisher-Rams against him.
          He looked good playing for the Vikings. But then, that begs the question of why didn’t they keep him?
          I guess we’ll find out, because I don’t see him getting displaced by Pax/Kelly.

          • cjfarls

            Its pretty clear why Minny didn’t keep him…. he’s probably not a top-10 QB, and its at least promising that Cousins probably is/could be that.

            Expecting Keenum to be a top-10 QB I don’t think is realistic… he’s not being paid like one, and last year seems a bit of an aberration, which was also helped a lot by his receivers making tough/contested catches, etc.

            The question for us is whether Keenum can be a top-20 QB (We’re paying him as the 19th ranked). I think that is plausible…. we probably will still be in the market for a QB upgrade if ever the opportunity presents, but our team can be competitive with a top-20 ranked QB. We can’t be competitive with a 25+ ranked QB.

          • Alaskan

            Looking through my orange colored glasses, I actually thought Trevor might become a serviceable QB.
            Then he got the yips after getting pounded behind our OL. But then, David Carr might have had an OK career if he didn’t get sacked 76 times in his rookie season.Running for your life from large people who want to do you bodily harm has to take a toll.
            Like most people, I do not seem to be very good at prognosticating how QB’s will turn out (although I did expect greatness from Elway, but that was an easy call). I don’t know what to expect from Case.

          • cjfarls

            Carr’s complete lack of pocket awareness didn’t help him… I think when he was replaced, his oline’s sack rate cut by roughly 50%. 40sacks/year is still a lot, but its a farcry different than 75+.

          • DragonPie

            I think that all decent QB’s have a way of dealing with pressure. Some, like Manning, Brees, Brady get rid of the ball extremely quickly with great decision making abilities and great reading abilities. If they don’t do that at an elite level, they showcase escapability such as Russel Wilson, Aaron Rodgers, Ben Roethlisberger. Some of these guys can do a bit of both which is always an asset.

            All QB’s do better when not pressured, but pressure rates and sack rates have a lot to do with the QB as well as the line.

            I do not think that it’s easy to tell which college QB’s will be able to adjust to the quick decision making in the NFL that will help a QB succeed. The best bet is to go with guys who did well in college.

    • DCJ1

      I’d probably have had the same reaction as I had years ago when Shanahan skipped Pennington and chose O’Neal.

      • Drewredux

        I flipped all the way out when Denver selected Steve Atwater over Louis Oliver.

  • RSH
    • RSH

      Jersey number 69 went unclaimed further pointing to this draft class’s maturity. 🙂

      • WhoShotBobbyHumphrey

        Boooo!!!!!

    • Nick

      The NFL really needs to let RBs and DBs out of the 20-49 purgatory.

      • Yahmule

        Agreed. 50-79 should be reserved for O linemen and everything else should be fair game.

        • G Mik

          Such a simple thing to change but the NFL won’t do it until it’s too late. I get it from a rules perspective but the game has changed so much and no one keys off of a number. That said, your workaround solves that problem anyway.

          • Nick

            I don’t even get it from a rules perspective. Other than the OL there’s no reason to restrict numbers at all. That’s what college football does without any issue.

    • Drewredux

      Damn Millennials! Terrible taste in mumbers, most of them.

      • Tyler

        If he performs as expected I suspect you will grow to love the number.

        • Drewredux

          Chubb’s is cool. Then it goes down hill to Fumagalli.

          I mean 37, Royce? That is bottom barrell S territory, certainly not feature back…😊

          • Tyler

            Oh I only looked at the picture. 37 for Freeman? Would it be an overreaction to cut him now?

          • G Mik

            37 is a magical number! Take any single digit number – for ex: 8. Make it 888 and divide that by adding the 8’s together (24) and you’ll get…. you guessed it – 37! Works for any number 1-9. Magic and shit.

          • FarAwayBroncoFan

            Whoa. Freaky shit.

          • DragonPie

            Ramanujan? Is that you?

          • Gmunny33

            I’m always learning something here

          • Yahmule
          • Tyler

            Whatever happened to LaMichael James?

          • Alaskan

            Let’s not discuss that.

          • Yahmule

            He was drafted by the Niners, rode pokey behind Frank Gore, and went on to get mentioned in Royce Freeman articles.

      • RSH

        In their defense, they did not have many options to choose from. I suspect that many of these jersey numbers will be different by Week 1. For example, Phillip Lindsay will definitely have to change his jersey number if he makes the final roster.

    • Jeremy

      So is 24 still unclaimed?

      • Tyler

        Seems to be unofficially retired. Perhaps they are waiting to make it official for when he is inducted into the HOF.

  • Yahmule

    And there was much rejoicing!

    May 10, 2018

  • Drewredux